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Viruses 2014, 6(1), 137-150; doi:10.3390/v6010137
Article

ABSL-4 Aerobiology Biosafety and Technology at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick

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Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 18 December 2013 / Accepted: 20 December 2013 / Published: 7 January 2014
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Abstract

The overall threat of a viral pathogen to human populations is largely determined by the modus operandi and velocity of the pathogen that is transmitted among humans. Microorganisms that can spread by aerosol are considered a more challenging enemy than those that require direct body-to-body contact for transmission, due to the potential for infection of numerous people rather than a single individual. Additionally, disease containment is much more difficult to achieve for aerosolized viral pathogens than for pathogens that spread solely via direct person-to-person contact. Thus, aerobiology has become an increasingly necessary component for studying viral pathogens that are naturally or intentionally transmitted by aerosol. The goal of studying aerosol viral pathogens is to improve public health preparedness and medical countermeasure development. Here, we provide a brief overview of the animal biosafety level 4 Aerobiology Core at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, Maryland, USA.
Keywords: ABSL-4; aerobiology; biosafety level 4; class III biosafety cabinet; BSL-4; high-consequence viral pathogens; medical countermeasure; viral hemorrhagic fever ABSL-4; aerobiology; biosafety level 4; class III biosafety cabinet; BSL-4; high-consequence viral pathogens; medical countermeasure; viral hemorrhagic fever
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Lackemeyer, M.G.; Kok-Mercado, F.D.; Wada, J.; Bollinger, L.; Kindrachuk, J.; Wahl-Jensen, V.; Kuhn, J.H.; Jahrling, P.B. ABSL-4 Aerobiology Biosafety and Technology at the NIH/NIAID Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick. Viruses 2014, 6, 137-150.

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