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Viruses 2012, 4(10), 2115-2136; doi:10.3390/v4102115
Article

A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques

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Received: 30 August 2012; in revised form: 4 October 2012 / Accepted: 4 October 2012 / Published: 15 October 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Filovirus Research 2012)
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Abstract: Filoviruses are members of the genera Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and “Cuevavirus”. Because they cause human disease with high lethality and could potentially be used as a bioweapon, these viruses are classified as CDC Category A Bioterrorism Agents. Filoviruses are relatively stable in aerosols, retain virulence after lyophilization, and can be present on contaminated surfaces for extended periods of time. This study explores the characteristics of aerosolized Sudan virus (SUDV) Boniface in non-human primates (NHP) belonging to three different species. Groups of cynomolgus macaques (cyno), rhesus macaques (rhesus), and African green monkeys (AGM) were challenged with target doses of 50 or 500 plaque-forming units (pfu) of aerosolized SUDV. Exposure to either viral dose resulted in increased body temperatures in all three NHP species beginning on days 4–5 post-exposure. Other clinical findings for all three NHP species included leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, dehydration, and lymphadenopathy. Disease in all of the NHPs was severe beginning on day 6 post-exposure, and all animals except one surviving rhesus macaque were euthanized by day 14. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) concentrations were elevated during the course of disease in all three species; however, AGMs had significantly higher ALT and AST concentrations than cynos and rhesus. While all three species had detectable viral load by days 3-4 post exposure, Rhesus had lower average peak viral load than cynos or AGMs. Overall, the results indicate that the disease course after exposure to aerosolized SUDV is similar for all three species of NHP.
Keywords: filovirus; ebolavirus; aerosol; primate; animal model filovirus; ebolavirus; aerosol; primate; animal model
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Zumbrun, E.E.; Bloomfield, H.A.; Dye, J.M.; Hunter, T.C.; Dabisch, P.A.; Garza, N.L.; Bramel, N.R.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.D.; Nichols, D.K.; Nalca, A. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques. Viruses 2012, 4, 2115-2136.

AMA Style

Zumbrun EE, Bloomfield HA, Dye JM, Hunter TC, Dabisch PA, Garza NL, Bramel NR, Baker RJ, Williams RD, Nichols DK, Nalca A. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques. Viruses. 2012; 4(10):2115-2136.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Dye, John M.; Hunter, Ty C.; Dabisch, Paul A.; Garza, Nicole L.; Bramel, Nicholas R.; Baker, Reese J.; Williams, Roger D.; Nichols, Donald K.; Nalca, Aysegul. 2012. "A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques." Viruses 4, no. 10: 2115-2136.



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