Next Article in Journal
Fabrication of Glass Fiber Reinforced Composites Based on Bio-Oil Phenol Formaldehyde Resin
Previous Article in Journal
Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Intriguing Method for Fabricating Arbitrarily Shaped “Matreshka” Hydrogels Using a Self-Healing Template
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Materials 2016, 9(11), 887; doi:10.3390/ma9110887

Fabrication of Cell-Loaded Two-Phase 3D Constructs for Tissue Engineering

Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstraße 6, Erlangen 91058, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peter Dubruel
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 17 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Hydrogels for (Bio)printing Applications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5457 KB, uploaded 1 November 2016]   |  

Abstract

Hydrogel optimisation for biofabrication considering shape stability/mechanical properties and cell response is challenging. One approach to tackle this issue is to combine different additive manufacturing techniques, e.g., hot-melt extruded thermoplastics together with bioplotted cell loaded hydrogels in a sequential plotting process. This method enables the fabrication of 3D constructs mechanically supported by the thermoplastic structure and biologically functionalised by the hydrogel phase. In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) blend (PCL-PEG) together with alginate dialdehyde gelatine hydrogel (ADA-GEL) loaded with stromal cell line (ST2) were investigated. PCL-PEG blends were evaluated concerning plotting properties to fabricate 3D scaffolds, namely miscibility, wetting behaviour and in terms of cell response. Scaffolds were characterised considering pore size, porosity, strut width, degradation behaviour and mechanical stability. Blends showed improved hydrophilicity and cell response with PEG blending increasing the degradation and decreasing the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Hybrid constructs with PCL-PEG blend and ADA-GEL were fabricated. Cell viability, distribution, morphology and interaction of cells with the support structure were analysed. Increased degradation of the thermoplastic support structure and proliferation of the cells not only in the hydrogel, but also on the thermoplastic phase, indicates the potential of this novel material combination for biofabricating 3D tissue engineering scaffolds. View Full-Text
Keywords: sequential bioplotting; biofabrication; polycaprolactone; hydrogels; alginate dialdehyde; gelatine; tissue engineering sequential bioplotting; biofabrication; polycaprolactone; hydrogels; alginate dialdehyde; gelatine; tissue engineering
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zehnder, T.; Freund, T.; Demir, M.; Detsch, R.; Boccaccini, A.R. Fabrication of Cell-Loaded Two-Phase 3D Constructs for Tissue Engineering. Materials 2016, 9, 887.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Materials EISSN 1996-1944 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top