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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(8), 3114-3133; doi:10.3390/ijerph8083114
Article

Residential Pesticide Usage in Older Adults Residing in Central California

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Received: 1 March 2011; in revised form: 6 July 2011 / Accepted: 20 July 2011 / Published: 25 July 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pesticides and Health)
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Abstract: Information on residential pesticide usage and behaviors that may influence pesticide exposure was collected in three population-based studies of older adults residing in the three Central California counties of Fresno, Kern, and Tulare. We present data from participants in the Study of Use of Products and Exposure Related Behaviors (SUPERB) study (N = 153) and from community controls ascertained in two Parkinson’s disease studies, the Parkinson’s Environment and Gene (PEG) study (N = 359) and The Center for Gene-Environment Studies in Parkinson’s Disease (CGEP; N = 297). All participants were interviewed by telephone to obtain information on recent and lifetime indoor and outdoor residential pesticide use. Interviews ascertained type of product used, frequency of use, and behaviors that may influence exposure to pesticides during and after application. Well over half of all participants reported ever using indoor and outdoor pesticides; yet frequency of pesticide use was relatively low, and appeared to increase slightly with age. Few participants engaged in behaviors to protect themselves or family members and limit exposure to pesticides during and after treatment, such as ventilating and cleaning treated areas, or using protective equipment during application. Our findings on frequency of use over lifetime and exposure related behaviors will inform future efforts to develop population pesticide exposure models and risk assessment.
Keywords: pesticides; residential exposure; exposure-related behavior; lifetime use; older adults pesticides; residential exposure; exposure-related behavior; lifetime use; older adults
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Armes, M.N.; Liew, Z.; Wang, A.; Wu, X.; Bennett, D.H.; Hertz-Picciotto, I.; Ritz, B. Residential Pesticide Usage in Older Adults Residing in Central California. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8, 3114-3133.

AMA Style

Armes MN, Liew Z, Wang A, Wu X, Bennett DH, Hertz-Picciotto I, Ritz B. Residential Pesticide Usage in Older Adults Residing in Central California. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2011; 8(8):3114-3133.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Armes, Mary N.; Liew, Zeyan; Wang, Anthony; Wu, Xiangmei; Bennett, Deborah H.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Ritz, Beate. 2011. "Residential Pesticide Usage in Older Adults Residing in Central California." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 8, no. 8: 3114-3133.


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert