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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1548; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071548

It Doesn’t End There: Workplace Bullying, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Employee Well-Being in Korea

1
Department of Child and Family Studies, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Department of Biobehavioral Health, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16802, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 22 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Total Worker Health to Advance Worker Health and Safety)
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Abstract

Workplace bullying entails negative consequences on workers’ life. Yet, there is lack of research on workplace bullying in an Asian context. Moreover, less is known about the potential mechanisms linking workplace bullying and employee well-being. This study examined the associations between workplace bullying and Korean employees’ well-being (quality of life, occupational health) and whether the associations were mediated by work-to-family conflict. Cross-sectional data came from 307 workers in South Korea who were employed in healthcare, education, and banking industries. Analyses adjusted for industry, age, gender, education, marital status, and work hours. Employees who had more exposure to workplace bullying reported lower levels of quality of life and occupational health. These associations were mediated by work-to-family conflict, such that more exposure to workplace bullying was associated with greater work-to-family conflict, which, in turn, was associated with lower levels of quality of life and occupational health. These mediating pathways were consistent across the three industries. Korean employees who experience more workplace bullying may bring unfinished work stress to the home (thus greater work-to-family conflict), which impairs their well-being. Future research may need to consider the role of work-to-family conflict when targeting to reduce the negative consequences of workplace bullying. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace bullying; quality of life; occupational health; work-to-family conflict; Korean workplaces workplace bullying; quality of life; occupational health; work-to-family conflict; Korean workplaces
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Yoo, G.; Lee, S. It Doesn’t End There: Workplace Bullying, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Employee Well-Being in Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1548.

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