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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 383; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040383

Television Viewing and Its Association with Sedentary Behaviors, Self-Rated Health and Academic Performance among Secondary School Students in Peru

1
Yonsei Global Health Center, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493, Korea
2
Department of Health Administration, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Wonju 26493, Korea
3
Department of Nursing, Cheongju University, Cheongju City 28503, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 3 February 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 1 April 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Collection Health Behavior and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [315 KB, uploaded 10 April 2017]

Abstract

The study assessed television viewing >2 h a day and its association with sedentary behaviors, self-rated health, and academic performance among secondary school adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among randomly selected students in Lima in 2015. We measured self-reported responses of students using a standard questionnaire, and conducted in-depth interviews with 10 parents and 10 teachers. Chi-square test, correlation and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed among 1234 students, and thematic analysis technique was used for qualitative information. A total of 23.1% adolescents reported watching television >2 h a day. Qualitative findings also show that adolescents spend most of their leisure time watching television, playing video games or using the Internet. Television viewing had a significant positive correlation with video game use in males and older adolescents, with Internet use in both sexes, and a negative correlation with self-rated health and academic performance in females. Multivariate logistic regression analysis shows that television viewing >2 h a day, independent of physical activity was associated with video games use >2 h a day, Internet use >2 h a day, poor/fair self-rated health and poor self-reported academic performance. Television viewing time and sex had a significant interaction effect on both video game use >2 h a day and Internet use >2 h a day. Reducing television viewing time may be an effective strategy for improving health and academic performance in adolescents. View Full-Text
Keywords: television viewing; sedentary behaviors; self-rated health; self-reported academic performance television viewing; sedentary behaviors; self-rated health; self-reported academic performance
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sharma, B.; Cosme Chavez, R.; Jeong, A.S.; Nam, E.W. Television Viewing and Its Association with Sedentary Behaviors, Self-Rated Health and Academic Performance among Secondary School Students in Peru. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 383.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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