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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(4), 385; doi:10.3390/ijerph14040385

How Does Ambient Air Temperature Affect Diabetes Mortality in Tropical Cities?

1
Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City 305-8577, Japan
2
Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Public Health, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City 70000, Vietnam
3
Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City 305-8577, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Peng Bi
Received: 28 February 2017 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extreme Weather and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1182 KB, uploaded 5 April 2017]   |  

Abstract

Diabetes is well-known as one of the many chronic diseases that affect different age groups. Currently, most studies that evaluated the effects of temperature on diabetes mortality focused on temperate and subtropical settings, but no study has been conducted to assess the relationship in a tropical setting. We conducted the first multi-city study carried out in tropical cities, which evaluated the temperature–diabetes relationship. We collected daily diabetes mortality (ICD E10–E14) of four Philippine cities from 2006 to 2011. Same period meteorological data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We used a generalized additive model coupled with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) in determining the relative risks. Results showed that both low and high temperatures pose greater risks among diabetics. Likewise, the study was able to observe the: (1) high risk brought about by low temperature, aside from the largely observed high risks by high temperature; and (2) protective effects in low temperature percentile. These results provide significant policy implications with strategies related to diabetes risk groups in relation to health service and care strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: tropical cities; diabetes; temperature-mortality; low temperature effects; DLNM tropical cities; diabetes; temperature-mortality; low temperature effects; DLNM
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MDPI and ACS Style

Seposo, X.T.; Dang, T.N.; Honda, Y. How Does Ambient Air Temperature Affect Diabetes Mortality in Tropical Cities? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 385.

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