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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1272; doi:10.3390/ijerph14101272

Parents’ Perceived Barriers to Accessing Sports and Recreation Facilities in Ontario, Canada: Exploring the Relationships between Income, Neighbourhood Deprivation, and Community

Health Promotion, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, Public Health Ontario, 480 University Ave., Toronto, ON M5G 1V2, Canada
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Academic Editor: James Dollman
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 12 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 23 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Environmental Influences on Physical Activity Behaviours)
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Abstract

Sports and recreation facilities provide places where children can be physically active. Previous research has shown that availability is often worse in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) areas, yet others have found inverse relationships, no relationships, or mixed findings. Since children’s health behaviours are influenced by their parents, it is important to understand parents’ perceived barriers to accessing sports and recreation facilities. Data from computer assisted telephone interviews with parents living in Ontario, Canada were merged via postal codes with neighbourhood deprivation data. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the likelihood that parents reported barriers to accessing local sports and recreation facilities. Parents with lower household incomes were more likely to report barriers to access. For each unit increase in deprivation score (i.e., more deprived), the likelihood of reporting a barrier increased 16% (95% CI: 1.04, 1.28). For parents, the relationships between household income, neighbourhood-level deprivation, and barriers are complex. Understanding these relationships is important for research, policy and planning, as parental barriers to opportunities for physical activity have implications for child health behaviours, and ultimately childhood overweight and obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: access to sports and recreation facilities; physical activity; socioeconomic status; income; neighbourhood deprivation; parents access to sports and recreation facilities; physical activity; socioeconomic status; income; neighbourhood deprivation; parents
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Harrington, D.W.; Jarvis, J.W.; Manson, H. Parents’ Perceived Barriers to Accessing Sports and Recreation Facilities in Ontario, Canada: Exploring the Relationships between Income, Neighbourhood Deprivation, and Community. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1272.

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