Next Article in Journal
Behaviors Related to Mosquito-Borne Diseases among Different Ethnic Minority Groups along the China-Laos Border Areas
Next Article in Special Issue
Inappropriate Use of Medication by Elderly, Polymedicated, or Multipathological Patients with Chronic Diseases
Previous Article in Journal
Identification of Genetic Interaction with Risk Factors Using a Time-To-Event Model
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dynamics of Implementation and Maintenance of Organizational Health Interventions
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1229; doi:10.3390/ijerph14101229

Barriers and Facilitators for Health Behavior Change among Adults from Multi-Problem Households: A Qualitative Study

1
Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University (CAPHRI), Maastricht 6200 MD, The Netherlands
2
Department of Family Medicine, Maastricht University (CAPHRI), Maastricht 6200 MD, The Netherlands
3
IVO Addiction Research Institute, Rotterdam 3021 DM, The Netherlands
4
Chair Group Health & Society, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen 6700 EW, The Netherlands
5
Stimenz, Apeldoorn 7311 JD, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 July 2017 / Revised: 29 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 October 2017 / Published: 15 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Health Intervention to Reduce Chronic Disease)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [712 KB, uploaded 15 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

Multi-problem households are households with problems on more than one of the following core problem areas: socio-economic problems, psycho-social problems, and problems related to child care. The aim of this study was to examine barriers and facilitators for health behavior change among adults from multi-problem households, as well as to identify ideas for a health promotion program. A qualitative study involving 25 semi-structured interviews was conducted among Dutch adults who received intensive family home care for multi-problem households. Results were discussed with eight social workers in a focus group interview. Data were analyzed using the Framework Method. The results revealed that the main reason for not engaging in sports were the costs. Physical activity was facilitated by physically active (transport to) work and by dog ownership. Respondents who received a food bank package reported this as a barrier for healthy eating. Those with medical conditions such as diabetes indicated that this motivated them to eat healthily. Smokers and former smokers reported that stress was a major barrier for quitting smoking but that medical conditions could motivate them to quit smoking. A reported reason for not using alcohol was having difficult past experiences such as violence and abuse by alcoholics. Mentioned intervention ideas were: something social, an outdoor sports event, cooking classes, a walking group, and children’s activities in nature. Free or cheap activities that include social interaction and reduce stress are in line with the identified barriers and facilitators. Besides these activities, it may be important to influence the target group’s environment by educating social workers and ensuring healthier food bank packages. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthy lifestyle; multi-problem households; smoking; physical activity; nutrition; alcohol; social class; Netherlands healthy lifestyle; multi-problem households; smoking; physical activity; nutrition; alcohol; social class; Netherlands
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Nagelhout, G.E.; Hogeling, L.; Spruijt, R.; Postma, N.; de Vries, H. Barriers and Facilitators for Health Behavior Change among Adults from Multi-Problem Households: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1229.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top