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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1227; doi:10.3390/ijerph14101227

Behaviors Related to Mosquito-Borne Diseases among Different Ethnic Minority Groups along the China-Laos Border Areas

1
Yunnan Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Puer 665000, China
2
Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
3
Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan 442000, China
4
Xishuangbanna Prefecture Center of Disease prevention and Control, Jinghong 666100, China
These authors contribute equally to the work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 September 2017 / Revised: 2 October 2017 / Accepted: 12 October 2017 / Published: 15 October 2017
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Abstract

Background: In China, mosquito-borne diseases are most common in the sub-tropical area of Yunnan province. The objective of this study was to examine behaviors related to mosquito-borne diseases in different ethnic minority groups and different socioeconomic groups of people living in this region. Methods: A stratified two-stage cluster sampling technique with probability proportional to size was used in Mengla County, Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan. Twelve villages were used to recruit adult (≥18 years old) and eight schools were used for children (<18 years old). A questionnaire on behaviors and environment variables related to mosquito-borne diseases was devised. Results: Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) grouped 20 behaviors into three domains, namely, environmental condition, bed net use behaviors, and repellent use behaviors, respectively. The Han ethnicity had the lowest odds of rearing pigs, their odds being significantly lower than those of Yi and Yao. For bed net use, Dai and other ethnic minority groups were less likely to use bed nets compared to Yi and Yao. The odds of repellent use in the Han ethnicity was lower than in Yi, but higher than in Dai. The Dai group was the most likely ethnicity to use repellents. Farmers were at a higher risk for pig rearing and not using repellents. Education of less than primary school held the lowest odds of pig rearing. Those with low income were at a higher risk for not using bed nets and repellent except in pig rearing. Those with a small family size were at a lower risk for pig rearing. Conclusion: Different ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the study areas require different specific emphases for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: behaviors; mosquito-borne diseases; bed nets; repellent; environment; multiple correspondence analysis; ethnic group behaviors; mosquito-borne diseases; bed nets; repellent; environment; multiple correspondence analysis; ethnic group
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wu, C.; Guo, X.; Zhao, J.; Lv, Q.; Li, H.; McNeil, E.B.; Chongsuvivatwong, V.; Zhou, H. Behaviors Related to Mosquito-Borne Diseases among Different Ethnic Minority Groups along the China-Laos Border Areas. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1227.

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