Next Article in Journal
Critical Windows of Prenatal Exposure to Cadmium and Size at Birth
Next Article in Special Issue
Recruitment of Refugees for Health Research: A Qualitative Study to Add Refugees’ Perspectives
Previous Article in Journal
Transparency of Mandatory Information Disclosure and Concerns of Health Services Providers and Consumers
Previous Article in Special Issue
Gendered Sources of Distress and Resilience among Afghan Refugees in Northern California: A Cross-Sectional Study
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 54; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010054

Maternal and Child Health of Internally Displaced Persons in Ukraine: A Qualitative Study

1
Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters, Institute of Health and Society, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels 1200, Belgium
2
Food Security Unit, Sustainable Resources Directorate, European Commission Joint Research Centre, I-21027 Ispra, Italy
3
Institute of Health and Society, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels 1200, Belgium
4
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou, Jimmy T. Efird and Pollie Bith-Melander
Received: 14 November 2016 / Revised: 30 December 2016 / Accepted: 3 January 2017 / Published: 9 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refugee Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [286 KB, uploaded 9 January 2017]

Abstract

Due to the conflict that started in spring 2014 in Eastern Ukraine, a total of 1.75 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) fled the area and have been registered in government-controlled areas of the country. This paper explores perceived health, barriers to access to healthcare, caring practices, food security, and overall financial situation of mothers and young children displaced by the conflict in Ukraine. This is a qualitative study, which collected data through semi-structured in-depth interviews with nine IDP mothers via Skype and Viber with a convenience sample of participants selected through snowball technique. Contrary to the expectations, the perceived physical health of mothers and their children was found not to be affected by conflict and displacement, while psychological distress was often reported. A weak healthcare system, Ukraine’s proneness to informal payments, and heavy bureaucracy to register as an IDP were reported in our study. A precarious social safety net to IDP mothers in Ukraine, poor dietary diversity, and a generalized rupture of vaccine stocks, with halted or delayed vaccinations in children were identified. Increasing social allowances and their timely delivery to IDP mothers might be the most efficient policy measure to improve health and nutrition security. Reestablishment and sustainability of vaccine stocks in Ukraine is urgent to avoid the risks of a public health crisis. Offering psychological support for IDP mothers is recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ukraine; maternal health; child health; reproductive health; mental health; IDPs; conflict; crisis; humanitarian response Ukraine; maternal health; child health; reproductive health; mental health; IDPs; conflict; crisis; humanitarian response
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Nidzvetska, S.; Rodriguez-Llanes, J.M.; Aujoulat, I.; Gil Cuesta, J.; Tappis, H.; van Loenhout, J.A.F.; Guha-Sapir, D. Maternal and Child Health of Internally Displaced Persons in Ukraine: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top