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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 109; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010109

Antioxidant Pre-Treatment Reduces the Toxic Effects of Oxalate on Renal Epithelial Cells in a Cell Culture Model of Urolithiasis

1
Clinical Hospital Osijek, Josipa Huttlera 4, HR-31000 Osijek, Croatia
2
Faculty of Medicine Osijek, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Cara Hadrijana 10, HR-3100 Osijek, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 23 November 2016 / Revised: 10 January 2017 / Accepted: 17 January 2017 / Published: 23 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1678 KB, uploaded 23 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Urolithiasis is characterized by the formation and retention of solid crystals within the urinary tract. Kidney stones are mostly composed of calcium oxalate, which predominantly generates free radicals that are toxic to renal tubular cells. The aim of the study is to explore possible effects of antioxidant pre-treatment on inhibition of oxidative stress. Three cell lines were used as in vitro model of urolithiasis: MDCK I, MDCK II and LLC-PK1. Oxidative stress was induced by exposure of cells to sodium oxalate in concentration of 8 mM. In order to prevent oxidative stress, cells were pre-treated with three different concentrations of l-arginine and vitamin E. Oxidative stress was evaluated by determining the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), osteopontin (OPN), and by the concentration of glutathione (GSH). In all three cell lines, pre-treatment of antioxidants increased cell survival. Positive correlation of SOD and OPN expression as well as GSH concentration was observed in all groups of cells. Our results indicate that an antioxidant pre-treatment with l-arginine and vitamin E is able to hamper oxalate-induced oxidative stress in kidney epithelial cells and as such could play a role in prevention of urolithiasis. View Full-Text
Keywords: urolithiasis; vitamin E; l-arginine; Madin-Darby canine kidney cells; LLC-PK1 cells urolithiasis; vitamin E; l-arginine; Madin-Darby canine kidney cells; LLC-PK1 cells
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Kizivat, T.; Smolić, M.; Marić, I.; Tolušić Levak, M.; Smolić, R.; Bilić Čurčić, I.; Kuna, L.; Mihaljević, I.; Včev, A.; Tucak-Zorić, S. Antioxidant Pre-Treatment Reduces the Toxic Effects of Oxalate on Renal Epithelial Cells in a Cell Culture Model of Urolithiasis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 109.

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