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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 819; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080819

Using the Job Burden-Capital Model of Occupational Stress to Predict Depression and Well-Being among Electronic Manufacturing Service Employees in China

1
National Institute of Occupational Health and Poison Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100050, China
2
Graduate School of Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China
3
Henan Provincial Institute for Occupational Health, Zhengzhou 450052, China
4
School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 11 May 2016 / Revised: 28 July 2016 / Accepted: 30 July 2016 / Published: 12 August 2016
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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to identify the association between occupational stress and depression-well-being by proposing a comprehensive and flexible job burden-capital model with its corresponding hypotheses. Methods: For this research, 1618 valid samples were gathered from the electronic manufacturing service industry in Hunan Province, China; self-rated questionnaires were administered to participants for data collection after obtaining their written consent. The proposed model was fitted and tested through structural equation model analysis. Results: Single-factor correlation analysis results indicated that coefficients between all items and dimensions had statistical significance. The final model demonstrated satisfactory global goodness of fit (CMIN/DF = 5.37, AGFI = 0.915, NNFI = 0.945, IFI = 0.952, RMSEA = 0.052). Both the measurement and structural models showed acceptable path loadings. Job burden and capital were directly associated with depression and well-being or indirectly related to them through personality. Multi-group structural equation model analyses indicated general applicability of the proposed model to basic features of such a population. Gender, marriage and education led to differences in the relation between occupational stress and health outcomes. Conclusions: The job burden-capital model of occupational stress-depression and well-being was found to be more systematic and comprehensive than previous models. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational stress; job burden—capital model; structural equation model; depression; well-being occupational stress; job burden—capital model; structural equation model; depression; well-being
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, C.; Li, S.; Li, T.; Yu, S.; Dai, J.; Liu, X.; Zhu, X.; Ji, Y.; Wang, J. Using the Job Burden-Capital Model of Occupational Stress to Predict Depression and Well-Being among Electronic Manufacturing Service Employees in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 819.

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