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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 820; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080820

Heavy Metal Distribution in Street Dust from Traditional Markets and the Human Health Implications

1
College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Geologic Environment Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34132, Korea
3
East-West Nursing Research Institute, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, 26, Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yu-Pin Lin
Received: 23 June 2016 / Revised: 1 August 2016 / Accepted: 8 August 2016 / Published: 13 August 2016
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Abstract

Street dust is a hazard for workers in traditional markets. Exposure time is longer than for other people, making them vulnerable to heavy metals in street dust. This study investigated heavy metal concentrations in street dust samples collected from different types of markets. It compared the results with heavy metal concentrations in heavy traffic and rural areas. Street dust was significantly enriched with most heavy metals in a heavy traffic area while street dust from a fish market was contaminated with cupper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn). Street dust from medicinal herb and fruit markets, and rural areas were not contaminated. Principal component and cluster analyses indicated heavy metals in heavy traffic road and fish market dust had different sources. Relatively high heavy metal concentration in street dust from the fish market may negatively affect worker’s mental health, as depression levels were higher compared with workers in other markets. Therefore, intensive investigation of the relationship between heavy metal concentrations in street dust and worker’s health in traditional marketplaces should be conducted to elucidate the effect of heavy metals on psychological health in humans. View Full-Text
Keywords: heavy metal; marketplace; street; dust; health; depression heavy metal; marketplace; street; dust; health; depression
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Kim, J.A.; Park, J.H.; Hwang, W.J. Heavy Metal Distribution in Street Dust from Traditional Markets and the Human Health Implications. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 820.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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