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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 788; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080788

Social Interactions as a Source of Information about E-Cigarettes: A Study of U.S. Adult Smokers

1
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Rosenau Hall CB7440, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
3
RTI International, 3040 East Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mark Wolfson
Received: 12 May 2016 / Revised: 14 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 5 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue E-Cigarettes: Epidemiology, Policy and Public Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [616 KB, uploaded 5 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

The novelty of e-cigarettes and ambiguity about their effects may foster informal sharing of information, such as through social interactions. We aimed to describe smokers’ social interactions about e-cigarettes and their recommendations that others use e-cigarettes. Data were collected from 2149 adult smokers in North Carolina and California who participated in a study of the impact of pictorial cigarette pack warnings. In the previous month, almost half of participants (45%) reported talking to at least one person about e-cigarettes and nearly a third of participants (27%) recommended e-cigarettes to someone else. Smokers recommended e-cigarettes to cut back on smoking (57%), to quit smoking (48%), for health reasons (36%), and for fun (27%). In adjusted analyses, more frequent e-cigarette use, positive views about typical e-cigarette users, and attempting to quit smoking in the past month were associated with recommending e-cigarettes for health reasons (all p < 0.05). Social interactions appear to be a popular method of information-sharing about e-cigarettes among smokers. Health communication campaigns may help to fill in the gaps of smokers’ understanding of e-cigarettes and their long-term effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: social interactions; interpersonal communication; e-cigarettes; electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS); tobacco control social interactions; interpersonal communication; e-cigarettes; electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS); tobacco control
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Hall, M.G.; Pepper, J.K.; Morgan, J.C.; Brewer, N.T. Social Interactions as a Source of Information about E-Cigarettes: A Study of U.S. Adult Smokers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 788.

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