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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 786; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080786

Psychosocial Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Japanese Population

1
Department of Biochemistry, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005, Japan
2
Department of Health and Nutrition, Junior College of Shimane University, 100-205 Horo-machi, Matsue 690-0886, Japan
3
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Human Nutrition, Seitoku University, 550 Iwase, Matsudo 271-8555, Japan
4
Department of Human Life, Faculty of Food and Nutrition, Okayamagakuin University, 2-28-12-201 Kugahara, Ohta, Tokyo 146-0085, Japan
5
Department of Nutrition, Mimasaka Junior College, 50 kitazono-cho, Tsuyama 708-8511, Japan
6
Department of Brewing and Fermentation, Junior College of Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya, Tokyo 156-8502, Japan
7
Institute for Education and Student Services, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
8
Department of Life Science, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005, Japan
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 20 June 2016 / Revised: 24 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 5 August 2016
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Abstract

There is limited evidence in Japan regarding the psychosocial determinants of fruit/vegetable intake. We performed a cross-sectional study of people aged 18 years or older in four regions of Japan; 2308 (men: 1012, women: 1296) individuals who completed the questionnaires were included. We found that 24.8% of people were aware of the current recommendations for vegetables and 13.2% for fruit and that “ability to design meals” and “availability when eating outside of the home” were the most important factors related to self-efficacy and barriers to fruit and vegetable intake, respectively. People with high self-efficacy (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 2.17, 4.60 for fruit; OR: 4.52; 95% CI: 3.08, 6.64 for vegetables) were more likely to consume more fruit and vegetables. People with high scores on attitude (OR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.24) and social support (OR: 1.59; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.27) were more likely to consume more fruit. People with high perceived barriers (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.98) were less likely to consume fruit. This study suggests a need to increase the general population’s awareness of the fruit and vegetable intake recommendations; facilitating positive attitudes, self-efficacy, and social support for individuals and strengthening the ability of individuals to design meals with more vegetables and fruit might be useful intervention programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: fruit; vegetables; psychosocial factors; self-efficacy; perceived barrier; attitude; responsibility fruit; vegetables; psychosocial factors; self-efficacy; perceived barrier; attitude; responsibility
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, D.-H.; Kogashiwa, M.; Mori, N.; Yamashita, S.; Fujii, W.; Ueda, N.; Homma, H.; Suzuki, H.; Masuoka, N. Psychosocial Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Japanese Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 786.

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