Next Article in Journal
Psychosocial Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Japanese Population
Previous Article in Journal
Chinese Public Attention to the Outbreak of Ebola in West Africa: Evidence from the Online Big Data Platform
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(8), 783; doi:10.3390/ijerph13080783

Adding Natural Areas to Social Indicators of Intra-Urban Health Inequalities among Children: A Case Study from Berlin, Germany

1
Department of Geography, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin 10099, Germany
2
Department of Ecosystem Services, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZ, Leipzig 04318, Germany
3
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig 04103, Germany
4
Department of Computational Landscape Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZ, Leipzig 04318, Germany
5
Department of Work Science, Business Economics and Environmental Psychology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp 23053, Sweden
6
School of Population and Public Health and Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Harry Timmermans
Received: 6 May 2016 / Revised: 7 July 2016 / Accepted: 21 July 2016 / Published: 4 August 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1094 KB, uploaded 4 August 2016]   |  

Abstract

Research suggests that there is a relationship between the health of urban populations and the availability of green and water spaces in their daily environment. In this paper, we analyze the potential intra-urban relationships between children’s health determinants and outcomes and natural areas in Berlin, Germany. In particular, health indicators such as deficits in viso-motoric development in children are related to environmental indicators such as the natural area cover, natural area per capita and distance to natural areas; however, these indicators are also correlated with social determinants of health. The methodological approach used in this study included bivariate and multivariate analyses to explore the relations between health inequalities and social, socio-economic, and land use parameters. The results on a sub-district level indicated that there was a correlation between natural areas and social health determinants, both of which displayed a certain intra-urban spatial pattern. In particular, a lower percentage of natural area cover was correlated with deficits in viso-motoric development. However, results with percentage of natural area cover and per capita natural area with childhood overweight were not conclusive. No significant correlation was found for percentage of natural area cover and overweight, while significant negative correlation values were found between overweight and per capita natural area. This was identified particularly in the districts that had lower social conditions. On the other hand, the districts with the highest social conditions had the comparatively lowest levels of complete measles immunization. This study may facilitate public health work by identifying the urban areas in which the strengthening of health resources and actions should be prioritized and also calls for the inclusion of natural areas among the social health indicators included in intra-urban health inequality tools. View Full-Text
Keywords: health inequality; children’s health; green space; intra-urban; overweight; measles; cluster analysis health inequality; children’s health; green space; intra-urban; overweight; measles; cluster analysis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kabisch, N.; Haase, D.; Annerstedt van den Bosch, M. Adding Natural Areas to Social Indicators of Intra-Urban Health Inequalities among Children: A Case Study from Berlin, Germany. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 783.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top