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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 642; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070642

Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

1
Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China
2
Center for Meteorological Environment and Human Health, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China
3
School of Public Health, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China
4
Evidence Based Medicine Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China
5
College of Atmospheric Sciences, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu 610225, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 1 May 2016 / Revised: 18 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 June 2016 / Published: 28 June 2016
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Abstract

The objective was to assess the transient association between air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia. Five databases were searched for studies investigating the association between daily increases in air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and arrhythmia hospitalization or arrhythmia mortality. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed via a random-effects model and reported as relative risk and 95% confidence interval. 25 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria and 23 contributed to the meta-analysis. Arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality were associated with increases in PM2.5 (RR = 1.015 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.006–1.024), PM10 (RR = 1.009 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.004–1.014), carbon monoxide (RR = 1.041 per 1 ppm, 95% CI: 1.017–1.065), nitrogen dioxide (RR = 1.036 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.020–1.053), and sulfur dioxide (RR = 1.021 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.003–1.039), but not ozone (RR = 1.012 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 0.997–1.027). Both particulate and gaseous components, with the exception of ozone, have a temporal association with arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality. Compared with Europe and North America, a stronger association was noted in Asia. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; cardiac arrhythmia; meta-analysis; systematic review air pollution; cardiac arrhythmia; meta-analysis; systematic review
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Song, X.; Liu, Y.; Hu, Y.; Zhao, X.; Tian, J.; Ding, G.; Wang, S. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 642.

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