Next Article in Journal
Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review
Next Article in Special Issue
Hazard Prevention Regarding Occupational Accidents Involving Blue-Collar Foreign Workers: A Perspective of Taiwanese Manpower Agencies
Previous Article in Journal
The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(7), 638; doi:10.3390/ijerph13070638

Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature

1
School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Queensland 4001, Australia
2
Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Queensland 4001, Australia
3
Department of Construction Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Albert P. C. Chan and Wen Yi
Received: 10 March 2016 / Revised: 13 June 2016 / Accepted: 14 June 2016 / Published: 28 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effecting a Safe and Healthy Environment in Construction)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1015 KB, uploaded 28 June 2016]   |  

Abstract

Globally, falls from height (FFH) are a substantial public health jeopardy and are among the important leading causes of serious and fatal injuries for construction workers. A comprehensive understanding of the causal factors in FFH incidents is urgently required; however, the literature appears to lack a scientific review of FFH. In this study, 297 articles that contribute to the topic of fall incidents were reviewed. Seventy-five (75) articles met the criteria for relevance and were aggregated in a database to support a critical review. A synthesis of macro-variables approach was adopted rather than a structured meta-analysis. Such a method of analysis provides the flexibility to combine previous studies' findings. The most common factors associated with FFH are risky activities, individual characteristics, site conditions, organizational characteristics, agents (scaffolds/ladders) and weather conditions. The outcomes contributed to identifying the most significant research area for safety enhancement by improving engineering facilities, behaviour investigations and FFH prevention methods. View Full-Text
Keywords: fall from height; construction accidents; construction activities and prevention strategies fall from height; construction accidents; construction activities and prevention strategies
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Nadhim, E.A.; Hon, C.; Xia, B.; Stewart, I.; Fang, D. Falls from Height in the Construction Industry: A Critical Review of the Scientific Literature. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 638.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top