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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(5), 488; doi:10.3390/ijerph13050488

A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health

Department of Kinesiology, Brock University, 1812 Sir Isaac Brock Way, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Marlena Kruger and Hope Weiler
Received: 30 March 2016 / Revised: 3 May 2016 / Accepted: 5 May 2016 / Published: 11 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bone Health: Nutritional Perspectives)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [887 KB, uploaded 11 May 2016]   |  

Abstract

Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that “nutritional programming” of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health. View Full-Text
Keywords: bone mineral density; bone strength; bone structure; development; mice; isoflavones; nutritional programming; reproductive health; soy bone mineral density; bone strength; bone structure; development; mice; isoflavones; nutritional programming; reproductive health; soy
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ward, W.E.; Kaludjerovic, J.; Dinsdale, E.C. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 488.

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