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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(9), 11880-11892; doi:10.3390/ijerph120911880

Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China

1
,
1,* , 1,†
,
2,†
and
3,†
1
Urban Environmental Process and Digital Modeling Laboratory, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
2
Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing 100044, China
3
Department of Geography and Planning, State University of New York College at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 17 August 2015 / Revised: 12 September 2015 / Accepted: 12 September 2015 / Published: 22 September 2015
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Abstract

Fine particulate matter has become the premier air pollutant of Beijing in recent years, enormously impacting the environmental quality of the city and the health of the residents. Fine particles with aerodynamic diameters of 0~0.3 μm, 0.3~0.5 μm, and 0.5~1.0 μm, from the yeasr 2007 to 2012, were monitored, and the hospital data about respiratory diseases during the same period was gathered and calculated. Then the correlation between respiratory health and fine particles was studied by spatial analysis and grey correlation analysis. The results showed that the aerial fine particulate matter pollution was mainly distributed in the Zizhuyuan sub-district office. There was a certain association between respiratory health and fine particles. Outpatients with respiratory system disease in this study area were mostly located in the southeastern regions (Balizhuang sub-district office, Ganjiakou sub-district office, Wanshoulu sub-district office, and Yongdinglu sub-district office) and east-central regions (Zizhuyuan sub-district office and Shuangyushu sub-district office) of the study area. Correspondingly, PM1 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1.0 um) concentrations in these regions were higher than those in any other regions. Grey correlation analysis results showed that the correlation degree of the fine particle concentration with the number of outpatients is high, and the smaller fine particles had more obvious effects on respiratory system disease than larger particles. View Full-Text
Keywords: fine particulate matter; hospital admissions; respiratory diseases; functional areas; spatial distribution; grey correlation analysis fine particulate matter; hospital admissions; respiratory diseases; functional areas; spatial distribution; grey correlation analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Xiong, Q.; Zhao, W.; Gong, Z.; Zhao, W.; Tang, T. Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in Beijing, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 11880-11892.

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