Next Article in Journal
Pit Latrine Emptying Behavior and Demand for Sanitation Services in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
Previous Article in Journal
A Count Model to Study the Correlates of 60 Min of Daily Physical Activity in Portuguese Children
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(3), 2574-2587; doi:10.3390/ijerph120302574

The Gold Standard Program for Smoking Cessation is Effective for Participants Over 60 Years of Age

1,2,* , 1,2,3,†
and
4,5,†
1
Vascular Clinic, RK, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark
3
Centre for Clinical Education, Region Hovedstaden, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
4
WHO Collaborating Centres, Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
5
Clinical Health Promotion Centre, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö SE 205 02, Sweden
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Received: 21 October 2014 / Revised: 28 January 2015 / Accepted: 12 February 2015 / Published: 27 February 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [698 KB, uploaded 27 February 2015]   |  

Abstract

Background: Tobacco smoking is more prevalent among the elderly than among the young, and the elderly also have the most frequent contact with the health care system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Gold Standard Program, which is an intensive six-week smoking cessation program, on continuous self-reported abstinence rates after six months, on participants over the age of 60 years in a real life setting. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study from the national Danish smoking cessation database. Results: The database registered 7369 participants over the age of 60 years (range 60–82) and 24,294 below 60 years (range 15–59). Continuous abstinence rate after six months was 37% for the elderly compared to 35% for the younger (p < 0.05). The significant variables for continuous abstinence were: living with another adult (OR 1.10), prior professional recommendation for smoking cessation (OR 1.12), being compliant with program (OR 1.35) and being abstinent at end of course (OR 13.3). Conclusions: Participants over the age of 60 years had significantly higher continuous abstinence rates after six months than the participants less than 60 years. It is never too late for health professionals to recommend and educate patients about smoking cessation programs even if they are over 60 years of age. View Full-Text
Keywords: smoking cessation intervention; elderly; intensive program; Gold Standard Program (GSP); continuous abstinence; prospective cohort study; national database; Denmark smoking cessation intervention; elderly; intensive program; Gold Standard Program (GSP); continuous abstinence; prospective cohort study; national database; Denmark
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kehlet, M.; Schroeder, T.V.; Tønnesen, H. The Gold Standard Program for Smoking Cessation is Effective for Participants Over 60 Years of Age. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 2574-2587.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top