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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(8), 8251-8266; doi:10.3390/ijerph110808251

Cancer Screening among Immigrants Living in Urban and Regional Australia: Results from the 45 and Up Study

1
Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW, P.O. Box 572 Kings Cross, NSW 1340, Australia
2
School of Public Health, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia
4
School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Boorooma Street, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 June 2014 / Revised: 30 July 2014 / Accepted: 6 August 2014 / Published: 14 August 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migrant Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [356 KB, uploaded 14 August 2014]   |  

Abstract

Over 25% of the Australian population are immigrants, and are less active participants in cancer screening programmes. Most immigrants live in urban areas of Australia, but a significant proportion (~20%), live in regional areas. This study explored differences in cancer screening participation by place of birth and residence. Self-reported use of mammogram, faecal occult blood test (FOBT), and/or prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests was obtained from 48,642 immigrants and 141,275 Australian-born participants aged 50 years or older in the 45 and Up Study (New South Wales, Australia 2006–2010). Poisson regression was used to estimate relative risks of test use, adjusting for key socio-demographic characteristics. Overall, immigrants from Asia and Europe were less likely to have had any of the tests in the previous two years than Australian-born participants. Regional Australian-born participants were more likely to have had any of the tests than those living in urban areas. Regional immigrant participants were more likely to have had an FOBT or PSA test than those living in urban areas, but there were no differences in mammograms. This report identifies key immigrant groups in urban and regional areas that policymakers and healthcare providers should target with culturally appropriate information to promote cancer screening. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer screening; mammogram; faecal occult blood test; prostate specific antigen test; immigrants; regional Australia; geographic variation cancer screening; mammogram; faecal occult blood test; prostate specific antigen test; immigrants; regional Australia; geographic variation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Weber, M.F.; Chiew, M.; Feletto, E.; Kahn, C.; Sitas, F.; Webster, L. Cancer Screening among Immigrants Living in Urban and Regional Australia: Results from the 45 and Up Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 8251-8266.

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