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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(8), 8228-8250; doi:10.3390/ijerph110808228

Factors Influencing Household Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Qualitative Systematic Review

1
Department of Public Health and Policy, Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, Whelan Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GB, UK
2
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, Munich 81377, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 July 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 13 August 2014
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Abstract

Household burning of solid fuels in traditional stoves is detrimental to health, the environment and development. A range of improved solid fuel stoves (IS) are available but little is known about successful approaches to dissemination. This qualitative systematic review aimed to identify factors that influence household uptake of IS in low- and middle-income countries. Extensive searches were carried out and studies were screened and extracted using established systematic review methods. Fourteen qualitative studies from Asia, Africa and Latin-America met the inclusion criteria. Thematic synthesis was used to synthesise data and findings are presented under seven framework domains. Findings relate to user and stakeholder perceptions and highlight the importance of cost, good stove design, fuel and time savings, health benefits, being able to cook traditional dishes and cleanliness in relation to uptake. Creating demand, appropriate approaches to business, and community involvement, are also discussed. Achieving and sustaining uptake is complex and requires consideration of a broad range of factors, which operate at household, community, regional and national levels. Initiatives aimed at IS scale up should include quantitative evaluations of effectiveness, supplemented with qualitative studies to assess factors affecting uptake, with an equity focus. View Full-Text
Keywords: household air pollution; solid fuel use; improved stoves; scale up; adoption; developing countries household air pollution; solid fuel use; improved stoves; scale up; adoption; developing countries
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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Debbi, S.; Elisa, P.; Nigel, B.; Dan, P.; Eva, R. Factors Influencing Household Uptake of Improved Solid Fuel Stoves in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Qualitative Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 8228-8250.

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