Next Article in Journal
Next Article in Special Issue
Previous Article in Journal
Previous Article in Special Issue
A correction was published on 7 October 2014, see Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(10), 10362-10365.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(7), 6871-6889; doi:10.3390/ijerph110706871
Article

Respiratory Effects of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from Indoor Sources—A Randomized Sham-Controlled Exposure Study of Healthy Volunteers

1,* , 1
, 1
, 2
, 2
, 2
, 2,3
, 1,4
 and 1
Received: 28 March 2014; in revised form: 18 June 2014 / Accepted: 23 June 2014 / Published: 4 July 2014
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [601 KB, uploaded 4 July 2014]
Abstract: Particulate air pollution is linked to impaired respiratory health. We analyzed particle emissions from common indoor sources (candles burning (CB), toasting bread (TB), frying sausages (FS)) and lung function in 55 healthy volunteers (mean age 33.0 years) in a randomized cross-over controlled exposure study. Lung-deposited particle surface area concentration (PSC), size-specific particle number concentration (PNC) up to 10 µm, and particle mass concentration (PMC) of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 were determined during exposure (2 h). FEV1, FVC and MEF25%–75% was measured before, 4 h and 24 h after exposure. Wilcoxon-rank sum tests (comparing exposure scenarios) and mixed linear regression using particle concentrations and adjusting for personal characteristics, travel time and transportation means before exposure sessions were performed. While no effect was seen comparing the exposure scenarios and in the unadjusted model, inverse associations were found for PMC from CB and FS in relation to FEV1 and MEF25%–75%. with a change in 10 µg/m3 in PM2.5 from CB being associated with a change in FEV1 of −19 mL (95%-confidence interval:−43; 5) after 4 h. PMC from TB and PNC of UFP were not associated with lung function changes, but PSC from CB was. Elevated indoor fine particles from certain sources may be associated with small decreases in lung function in healthy adults.
Keywords: fine and ultrafine particles; controlled exposure; indoor sources; lung function fine and ultrafine particles; controlled exposure; indoor sources; lung function
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Soppa, V.J.; Schins, R.P.F.; Hennig, F.; Hellack, B.; Quass, U.; Kaminski, H.; Kuhlbusch, T.A.J.; Hoffmann, B.; Weinmayr, G. Respiratory Effects of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from Indoor Sources—A Randomized Sham-Controlled Exposure Study of Healthy Volunteers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 6871-6889.

AMA Style

Soppa VJ, Schins RPF, Hennig F, Hellack B, Quass U, Kaminski H, Kuhlbusch TAJ, Hoffmann B, Weinmayr G. Respiratory Effects of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from Indoor Sources—A Randomized Sham-Controlled Exposure Study of Healthy Volunteers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2014; 11(7):6871-6889.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soppa, Vanessa J.; Schins, Roel P.F.; Hennig, Frauke; Hellack, Bryan; Quass, Ulrich; Kaminski, Heinz; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J.; Hoffmann, Barbara; Weinmayr, Gudrun. 2014. "Respiratory Effects of Fine and Ultrafine Particles from Indoor Sources—A Randomized Sham-Controlled Exposure Study of Healthy Volunteers." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 11, no. 7: 6871-6889.



Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert