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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(6), 5698-5707; doi:10.3390/ijerph110605698

Effects of Partially Ionised Medical Oxygen, Especially with O2, in Vibration White Finger Patients

1
Department of Occupational Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, 04190 Kosice, Slovak Republic
2
Department of Occupational Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, Louis Pasteur University Hospital, 04190 Kosice, Slovak Republic
3
Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, 04001 Kosice, Slovak Republic
4
Cardiology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, 04001 Košice, Slovak Republic
5
Cardiology Clinic, East Slovakian Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, 04001 Košice, Slovak Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 March 2014 / Revised: 16 May 2014 / Accepted: 16 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
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Abstract

A major symptom of hand-arm vibration syndrome is a secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon—vibration white finger (VWF)—which results from a vasospasm of the digital arteries caused by work with vibration devices leading to occupational disease. Pharmacotherapy of VWF is often ineffective or has adverse effects. The aim of this work was to verify the influence of inhalation of partially ionized oxygen (O2) on peripheral blood vessels in the hands of patients with VWF. Ninety one (91)patients with VWF underwent four-finger adsorption plethysmography, and the pulse wave amplitude was recorded expressed in numeric parameters—called the native record. Next, a cold water test was conducted following with second plethysmography. The patients were divided in to the three groups. First and second inhaled 20-min of ionized oxygen O2 or oxygen O2 respectively. Thirth group was control without treatment. All three groups a follow-up third plethysmography—the post-therapy record. Changes in the pulse wave amplitudes were evaluated. Inpatients group inhaling O2 a modest increase of pulse wave amplitude was observed compared to the native record; patients inhaling medical oxygen O2 and the control showed a undesirable decline of pulse wave amplitude in VWF fingers. Strong vasodilatation were more frequent in the group inhaling O2 compare to O2 (p < 0.05). Peripheral vasodilatation achieved by inhalation of O2 could be used for VWF treatment without undesirable side effect in hospital as well as at home environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: hand-arm vibration syndrome; vibration white finger; cold provocation test; ionized oxygen therapy; O2; O2; finger plethysmography hand-arm vibration syndrome; vibration white finger; cold provocation test; ionized oxygen therapy; O2; O2; finger plethysmography
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Perečinský, S.; Murínová, L.; Engler, I.; Donič, V.; Murín, P.; Varga, M.; Legáth, Ľ. Effects of Partially Ionised Medical Oxygen, Especially with O2, in Vibration White Finger Patients. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 5698-5707.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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