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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(11), 12053-12063; doi:10.3390/ijerph111112053

Barriers and Facilitators to Being Physically Active on a Rural U.S. Northern Plains American Indian Reservation

1
Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, 2420 2nd Avenue North, Grand Forks, ND 58203, USA
2
Spirit Lake Dakota Nation, P.O. Box 359, Fort Totten, ND 58335, USA
3
Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Spirit Lake Dakota Nation, P.O. Box 269, Fort Totten, ND 58370, USA
4
Tate Topa Tribal School, Spirit Lake Dakota Nation, P.O. Box 211, St. Michael, ND 58370, USA
5
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, 1100 Bates Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 September 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 17 November 2014 / Published: 21 November 2014
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Abstract

The objective of the present study was to identify barriers to and facilitators of physical activity among American Indian adults living on a rural, U.S. Northern Plains reservation using the nominal group technique (NGT). NGT is a method of data generation and interpretation that combines aspects of qualitative (free generation of responses) and quantitative (systematic ranking of responses) methodologies. Adults participated in one of two NGT sessions asking about either barriers to (n = 6), or facilitators of (n = 5), being physically active. Participants nominated and ranked 21 barriers and 18 facilitators. Barriers indicated lack of knowledge of how to fit physical activity into a daily schedule, work, caring for family members, and prioritizing sedentary pursuits. Other responses included environmental barriers such as lack of access and transportation to a gym, unsafe walking conditions, and inclement weather. Facilitators to following recommendations included knowledge of health benefits of physical activity and the perception of physical activity as enjoyable, including feeling good when working out. Environmental facilitators included being outdoors walking and biking as well as parks and exercise facilities. Responses provided direction for locally designed community-based programs to promote facilitators and decrease barriers to individual’s engagement in physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: American Indians; physical activity; rural; reservation; barriers; facilitators American Indians; physical activity; rural; reservation; barriers; facilitators
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Jahns, L.; McDonald, L.R.; Wadsworth, A.; Morin, C.; Liu, Y. Barriers and Facilitators to Being Physically Active on a Rural U.S. Northern Plains American Indian Reservation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11, 12053-12063.

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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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