Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 3015-3032; doi:10.3390/ijerph10073015
Article

Educational Differences in Smoking among Adolescents in Germany: What is the Role of Parental and Adolescent Education Levels and Intergenerational Educational Mobility?

Department of Epidemiology and Health Monitoring, Robert Koch Institute, General-Pape-Strasse 62-66, Berlin 12101, Germany
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 June 2013; in revised form: 15 July 2013 / Accepted: 16 July 2013 / Published: 19 July 2013
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Abstract: Background: Adolescence is the period in which smoking onset usually occurs and the course for future socioeconomic status (SES) is set. However, because of the transitional nature of adolescence, it is questionable whether health inequalities are best measured by indicators of parental SES or rather by indicators of the adolescents’ own developing SES. We examine the independent effects of parental and adolescent education and intergenerational educational mobility on adolescent smoking behaviour while controlling for differences in parental and close friends’ smoking behaviour. Methods: The study is based on data from a subsample (12–17 years, n = 5,053) of the nationally representative German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Participants reported their education level as well as their personal and close friends’ smoking behaviour. Information on parental education and smoking behaviour was obtained via parent interviews. Adolescent and parental education data were dichotomized (low/high), leading to four categories of intergenerational educational mobility: stable high, potentially upwardly mobile, potentially downwardly mobile, and stable low. Results: After adjustment for parental and close friends’ smoking behaviour, adolescent smoking habits were strongly related to their personal education level, but not that of their parents. Among boys, both stable low and downwardly mobile adolescents had a 2.7-fold increased risk of being a smoker compared with peers with a stable high education. Among girls, only those with a stable low education had a 2.2-fold increased risk of smoking. Among both genders, educational upward mobility was associated with significantly lower smoking rates compared with peers with a stable low education (boys: OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.20–0.53; girls: OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.37–0.73). Conclusions: Our results show that the risk of an adolescent smoking is influenced by their own education level rather than that of their parents. Educational upward mobility seems to be protective against becoming a smoker in youth. Boys who experience downward mobility tend to have a significantly higher inclination to smoke than their peers with a stable high education. These findings illustrate the potential public health benefits of investments in education and help identify high-risk groups for smoking onset.
Keywords: adolescence; smoking; tobacco; education; socioeconomic status; social mobility; life course; health inequalities; KiGGS; Germany

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kuntz, B.; Lampert, T. Educational Differences in Smoking among Adolescents in Germany: What is the Role of Parental and Adolescent Education Levels and Intergenerational Educational Mobility? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 3015-3032.

AMA Style

Kuntz B, Lampert T. Educational Differences in Smoking among Adolescents in Germany: What is the Role of Parental and Adolescent Education Levels and Intergenerational Educational Mobility? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(7):3015-3032.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kuntz, Benjamin; Lampert, Thomas. 2013. "Educational Differences in Smoking among Adolescents in Germany: What is the Role of Parental and Adolescent Education Levels and Intergenerational Educational Mobility?" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 7: 3015-3032.

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