Next Article in Journal
Spatio-Temporal Epidemiology of Human West Nile Virus Disease in South Dakota
Next Article in Special Issue
Impediments to Comprehensive Research on Climate Change and Health
Previous Article in Journal
How Technology in Care at Home Affects Patient Self-Care and Self-Management: A Scoping Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Focusing Resource Allocation-Wellbeing as a Tool for Prioritizing Interventions for Communities at Risk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5565-5583; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115565
Article

Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia

1
, 1,* , 2
, 3
, 1
, 1
 and 1
Received: 2 September 2013; in revised form: 18 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 October 2013 / Published: 29 October 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Human Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [266 KB, uploaded 19 June 2014]   |   Browse Figures
Abstract: Among the challenges for rural communities and health services in Australia, climate change and increasing extreme heat are emerging as additional stressors. Effective public health responses to extreme heat require an understanding of the impact on health and well-being, and the risk or protective factors within communities. This study draws on lived experiences to explore these issues in eleven rural and remote communities across South Australia, framing these within a socio-ecological model. Semi-structured interviews with health service providers (n = 13), and a thematic analysis of these data, has identified particular challenges for rural communities and their health services during extreme heat. The findings draw attention to the social impacts of extreme heat in rural communities, the protective factors (independence, social support, education, community safety), and challenges for adaptation (vulnerabilities, infrastructure, community demographics, housing and local industries). With temperatures increasing across South Australia, there is a need for local planning and low-cost strategies to address heat-exacerbating factors in rural communities, to minimise the impact of extreme heat in the future.
Keywords: adaptation; climate change; extreme heat; health services; public health; rural health adaptation; climate change; extreme heat; health services; public health; rural health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Williams, S.; Bi, P.; Newbury, J.; Robinson, G.; Pisaniello, D.; Saniotis, A.; Hansen, A. Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 5565-5583.

AMA Style

Williams S, Bi P, Newbury J, Robinson G, Pisaniello D, Saniotis A, Hansen A. Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2013; 10(11):5565-5583.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Williams, Susan; Bi, Peng; Newbury, Jonathan; Robinson, Guy; Pisaniello, Dino; Saniotis, Arthur; Hansen, Alana. 2013. "Extreme Heat and Health: Perspectives from Health Service Providers in Rural and Remote Communities in South Australia." Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 10, no. 11: 5565-5583.


Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert