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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5284-5298; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115284
Article

The Dynamic Growth Exhibition and Accumulation of Cadmium of Pak Choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) Grown in Contaminated Soils

*  and
Department of Post-Modern Agriculture, MingDao University, No. 369, Wenhua Rd., Peetow, Changhua County 52345, Taiwan
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 July 2013 / Revised: 10 October 2013 / Accepted: 14 October 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Public Health)
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Abstract

The accumulation of heavy metals, especially cadmium (Cd), in leafy vegetables was compared with other vegetables. Pak choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) is a leafy vegetable consumed in Taiwan and its safety for consumption after growing in contaminated soils is a public concern. A pot experiment (50 days) was conducted to understand the dynamic accumulation of Cd by pak choi grown in artificially contaminated soils. The edible parts of pak choi were sampled and analyzed every 2–3 days. The dry weight (DW) of pak choi was an exponential function of leaf length, leaf width, and chlorophyll content. The accumulation of Cd increased when the soil Cd concentration was raised, but was kept at a constant level during different growth stages. Pak choi had a high bioconcentration factor (BCF = ratio of the concentration in the edible parts to that in the soils), at values of 3.5–4.0. The consumption of pak choi grown in soils contaminated at levels used in this study would result in the ingestion of impermissible amounts of Cd and could possibly have harmful effects on health.
Keywords: bioconcentration factor (BCF); cadmium (Cd); dynamic accumulation; pak choi bioconcentration factor (BCF); cadmium (Cd); dynamic accumulation; pak choi
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Lai, H.-Y.; Chen, B.-C. The Dynamic Growth Exhibition and Accumulation of Cadmium of Pak Choi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis) Grown in Contaminated Soils. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 5284-5298.

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