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Mar. Drugs 2015, 13(1), 249-266; doi:10.3390/md13010249

LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola

1
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
2
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
3
Metabolomics Australia, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniel Dias
Received: 26 September 2014 / Accepted: 29 December 2014 / Published: 7 January 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics - Applications in Marine Natural Products Chemistry)
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Abstract

An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A “chemical profile” link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time. View Full-Text
Keywords: Salinispora arenicola; salt concentration; antibiotic; metabolomics; secondary metabolites; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry; multivariate analysis Salinispora arenicola; salt concentration; antibiotic; metabolomics; secondary metabolites; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry; multivariate analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bose, U.; Hewavitharana, A.K.; Ng, Y.K.; Shaw, P.N.; Fuerst, J.A.; Hodson, M.P. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola. Mar. Drugs 2015, 13, 249-266.

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