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Mar. Drugs 2014, 12(4), 1773-1787; doi:10.3390/md12041773

Peridinin from the Marine Symbiotic Dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., Regulates Eosinophilia in Mice

1
Oceanography Section, Science Research Center, Kochi University, Okoh, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505, Japan
2
Medical Research Center, Kochi University, Okoh, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505, Japan
3
Laboratory of Human Health and Medical Science, Graduate School of Kuroshio Science, Kochi University, Okoh, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 25 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 27 March 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Carotenoids (Special Issue))
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Abstract

Peridinin and fucoxanthin, which are natural carotenoids isolated from a symbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., and a brown alga, Petalonia fascia, respectively, were compared for inhibitory effects on delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice. The number of eosinophils at the site of inflammation and in peripheral blood was compared for the administration of peridinin and fucoxanthin applied by painting and intraperitoneally. Peridinin, but not the structurally-related fucoxanthin, significantly suppressed the number of eosinophils in both the ear lobe and peripheral blood. Furthermore, peridinin applied topically, but not administered intraperitoneally, suppressed the level of eotaxin in the ears of sensitized mice. Fucoxanthin weakly suppressed the concentration of eotaxin in ears only by intraperitoneal administration. Although both carotenoids inhibited the migration of eosinophils toward eotaxin, the inhibitory effect of peridinin was higher than that of fucoxanthin. Peridinin may be a potential agent for suppressing allergic inflammatory responses, such as atopic dermatitis, in which eosinophils play a major role in the increase of inflammation.
Keywords: peridinin; fucoxanthin; delayed-type hypersensitivity; eosinophils; eotaxin; Symbiodinium; dinoflagellate peridinin; fucoxanthin; delayed-type hypersensitivity; eosinophils; eotaxin; Symbiodinium; dinoflagellate
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Onodera, K.-I.; Konishi, Y.; Taguchi, T.; Kiyoto, S.; Tominaga, A. Peridinin from the Marine Symbiotic Dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., Regulates Eosinophilia in Mice. Mar. Drugs 2014, 12, 1773-1787.

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