Pharmaceuticals 2012, 5(7), 727-744; doi:10.3390/ph5070727
Review

Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children

Received: 12 April 2012; in revised form: 26 June 2012 / Accepted: 29 June 2012 / Published: 6 July 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics and Prebiotics)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: There is increasing interest in the potential beneficial role of probiotic supplementation in the prevention and treatment of atopic diseases in children. Probiotics are defined as ingested live microorganisms that, when administered in an adequate amount, confer a health benefit to the host. They are mainly represented by Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Several epidemiological data demonstrate that intestinal microflora of atopic children is different from the one of healthy children. Many literature data show that probiotics may modulate the intestinal microflora composition and may have immunomodulatory effect. Based on this hypothesis, probiotics are supposed to confer benefits to allergic diseases. Administration of probiotics when a natural population of indigenous intestinal bacteria is still developing could theoretically influence immune development by favoring the balance between Th1 and Th2 inflammatory responses. For this reason, some studies have evaluated the potential impact of probiotics supplementation in the prevention of atopic dermatitis, with contrasting results. Clinical improvement in immunoglobulin (Ig)E-sensitized (atopic) eczema following probiotic supplementation has been reported in some published studies and the therapeutic effects of probiotics on atopic dermatitis seemed to be encouraging. However, as far as the usefulness of probiotics as a prevention strategy is concerned, results are still inconclusive. In fact, the clinical benefits of probiotic therapy depend upon numerous factors, such as the type of bacteria, dosing regimen, delivery method and other underlying host factors, such as age and diet. More studies are still needed to definitively prove the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic eczema.
Keywords: probiotics; atopic dermatitis; prevention; treatment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meneghin, F.; Fabiano, V.; Mameli, C.; Zuccotti, G.V. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children. Pharmaceuticals 2012, 5, 727-744.

AMA Style

Meneghin F, Fabiano V, Mameli C, Zuccotti GV. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children. Pharmaceuticals. 2012; 5(7):727-744.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meneghin, Fabio; Fabiano, Valentina; Mameli, Chiara; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo. 2012. "Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis in Children." Pharmaceuticals 5, no. 7: 727-744.

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