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Sensors 2015, 15(4), 9179-9188; doi:10.3390/s150409179

Measuring the Contractile Response of Isolated Tissue Using an Image Sensor

1
Industrial Engineering Department, School of Physics, La Laguna University, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez s/n, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
2
Bioorganic University Institute "Antonio González", La Laguna University, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez s/n, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
3
Pharmacology Unit, School of Medicine, La Laguna University, Av. Astrofísico Francisco Sánchez s/n, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, 38200 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexander Star
Received: 5 January 2015 / Revised: 19 March 2015 / Accepted: 15 April 2015 / Published: 20 April 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Biomaterials and Sensors for Tissue Engineering)
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Abstract

Isometric or isotonic transducers have traditionally been used to study the contractile/relaxation effects of drugs on isolated tissues. However, these mechanical sensors are expensive and delicate, and they are associated with certain disadvantages when performing experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, a method that uses an image sensor to measure the contractile effect of drugs on blood vessel rings and other luminal organs is presented. The new method is based on an image-processing algorithm, and it provides a fast, easy and non-expensive way to analyze the effects of such drugs. In our tests, we have obtained dose-response curves from rat aorta rings that are equivalent to those achieved with classical mechanic sensors. View Full-Text
Keywords: image sensor; isolated tissue; contractile response; photogrammetry; image-processing algorithm; monitoring drug effects image sensor; isolated tissue; contractile response; photogrammetry; image-processing algorithm; monitoring drug effects
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Díaz-Martín, D.; Hernández-Jiménez, J.G.; Rodríguez-Valido, M.; Borges, R. Measuring the Contractile Response of Isolated Tissue Using an Image Sensor. Sensors 2015, 15, 9179-9188.

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