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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(2), 330; doi:10.3390/ijms18020330

The Fungal Mycobiome and Its Interaction with Gut Bacteria in the Host

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, University Medicine Cluster, National University Health System, Singapore 119228, Singapore
2
Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive, Singapore 117599, Singapore
3
NUS Synthetic Biology for Clinical and Technological Innovation (SynCTI), Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, 28 Medical Drive, Singapore 117456, Singapore
4
Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, NUHS Tower Block, Level 11, 1E Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119228, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Patrick C. Y. Woo
Received: 29 November 2016 / Revised: 5 January 2017 / Accepted: 25 January 2017 / Published: 4 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Host-Microbe Interaction)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [464 KB, uploaded 4 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

The advent of sequencing technology has endowed us with the capacity to study microbes constituting the human commensal community that were previously non-culturable. Much of the initial works have concentrated on the bacterial flora constituting the gut microbiome, since specimens are readily accessible in health and disease. Less, however, is understood of the “silent population”—the fungal species, also known as the mycobiome. Living in symbiosis with bacteria as commensals in our body, it is perceivable that the mycobiome exerts an inadvertent influence on the microbiome. We review here the recent knowledge gained from study of the interaction between the mycobiome and microbiome in health and disease susceptibility, immunity, and consequences from antimicrobial treatment. View Full-Text
Keywords: fungus; mycobiome; gut microbiome; gastrointestinal; microflora; pathobiont fungus; mycobiome; gut microbiome; gastrointestinal; microflora; pathobiont
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Sam, Q.H.; Chang, M.W.; Chai, L.Y.A. The Fungal Mycobiome and Its Interaction with Gut Bacteria in the Host. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 330.

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