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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(10), 2187; doi:10.3390/ijms18102187

Nutritional and Acquired Deficiencies in Inositol Bioavailability. Correlations with Metabolic Disorders

1
Department of Experimental Medicine, Systems Biology Group, Sapienza University of Rome, viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome, Italy
2
Department of Surgery “Pietro Valdoni”, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Antonio Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome, Italy
3
Department of Medical Sciences, IPUS-Institute of Higher Education, 5250 Chiasso, Switzerland
4
Policlinico Umberto I, viale del Policlinico 155, 00161 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Correlation between Nutrition, Oxidative Stress and Disease)
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Abstract

Communities eating a western-like diet, rich in fat, sugar and significantly deprived of fibers, share a relevant increased risk of both metabolic and cancerous diseases. Even more remarkable is that a low-fiber diet lacks some key components—as phytates and inositols—for which a mechanistic link has been clearly established in the pathogenesis of both cancer and metabolic illness. Reduced bioavailability of inositol in living organisms could arise from reduced food supply or from metabolism deregulation. Inositol deregulation has been found in a number of conditions mechanistically and epidemiologically associated to high-glucose diets or altered glucose metabolism. Indeed, high glucose levels hinder inositol availability by increasing its degradation and by inhibiting both myo-Ins biosynthesis and absorption. These underappreciated mechanisms may likely account for acquired, metabolic deficiency in inositol bioavailability. View Full-Text
Keywords: myo-Inositol; phytate (InsP6); diabetes; myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX); diabetic nephropathy; cancer; inositol hexakisphosphate kinase (IP6K1); phosphatidic acid; Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase 1 (ISYNA1) myo-Inositol; phytate (InsP6); diabetes; myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX); diabetic nephropathy; cancer; inositol hexakisphosphate kinase (IP6K1); phosphatidic acid; Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase 1 (ISYNA1)
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dinicola, S.; Minini, M.; Unfer, V.; Verna, R.; Cucina, A.; Bizzarri, M. Nutritional and Acquired Deficiencies in Inositol Bioavailability. Correlations with Metabolic Disorders. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 2187.

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