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Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(1), 378-400; doi:10.3390/ijms16010378

Oxidative Stress in Obesity: A Critical Component in Human Diseases

1
Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125 Messina, Italy
2
Unit of Paediatric Genetics and Immunology, Department of Paediatrics, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125 Messina, Italy
3
Unit of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Pediatrics, University of Messina, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125 Messina, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Anthony Lemarié
Received: 3 November 2014 / Accepted: 15 December 2014 / Published: 26 December 2014
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [850 KB, uploaded 26 December 2014]   |  

Abstract

Obesity, a social problem worldwide, is characterized by an increase in body weight that results in excessive fat accumulation. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to several diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, fatty liver diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence allows us to understand the critical role of adipose tissue in controlling the physic-pathological mechanisms of obesity and related comorbidities. Recently, adipose tissue, especially in the visceral compartment, has been considered not only as a simple energy depository tissue, but also as an active endocrine organ releasing a variety of biologically active molecules known as adipocytokines or adipokines. Based on the complex interplay between adipokines, obesity is also characterized by chronic low grade inflammation with permanently increased oxidative stress (OS). Over-expression of oxidative stress damages cellular structures together with under-production of anti-oxidant mechanisms, leading to the development of obesity-related complications. The aim of this review is to summarize what is known in the relationship between OS in obesity and obesity-related diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; oxidative stress; adipocytokines; human diseases; adipose tissue obesity; oxidative stress; adipocytokines; human diseases; adipose tissue
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Marseglia, L.; Manti, S.; D’Angelo, G.; Nicotera, A.; Parisi, E.; Di Rosa, G.; Gitto, E.; Arrigo, T. Oxidative Stress in Obesity: A Critical Component in Human Diseases. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 378-400.

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