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Molecules 2017, 22(2), 283; doi:10.3390/molecules22020283

Iron Supply Affects Anthocyanin Content and Related Gene Expression in Berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon

1
College of Enology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China
2
College of Food Science and Technology, Hebei Normal University of Science & Technology, Qinhuangdao 066600, Hebei, China
3
College of Horticulture Science and Technology, Hebei Normal University of Science & Technology, Qinhuangdao 066600, Hebei, China
4
Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for Viti-Viniculture, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Derek J. McPhee
Received: 28 December 2016 / Revised: 8 February 2017 / Accepted: 10 February 2017 / Published: 14 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [763 KB, uploaded 14 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

Anthocyanins are important compounds for red grape and red wine quality, and can be influenced by supply of nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, and iron. The present work aims to gain a better understanding of the effect of iron supply on anthocyanins concentration in grape berries. To this end, own-rooted four-year-old Cabernet Sauvignon grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were fertigated every three days with 0, 23, 46, 92, and 184 μM iron (Fe) from ferric ethylenediamine di (o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (Fe-EDDHA) in a complete nutrient solution. Fe deficiency or excess generally led to higher concentrations of titratable acidity and skin/berry ratio, and to lower reducing sugar content, sugar/acid ratio, pH, berry weight, and concentration of anthocyanins. Most of the individual anthocyanins detected in this study, except cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside, and cyanidin-3-O-(6-O-coumaryl)-glucoside, in moderate Fe treatment (46 μM) grapes were significantly higher than those of other treatments. Genes encoding chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase (LDOX), and anthocyanin O-methyltransferase (AOMT) exhibited higher transcript levels in berries from plants cultivated with 46 μM Fe compared to the ones cultivated with other Fe concentrations. We suggest that grape sugar content, anthocyanins content, and transcriptions of genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were correlated with Fe supply concentrations. View Full-Text
Keywords: grape berry; anthocyanins; gene expression; sugar; iron grape berry; anthocyanins; gene expression; sugar; iron
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Shi, P.; Li, B.; Chen, H.; Song, C.; Meng, J.; Xi, Z.; Zhang, Z. Iron Supply Affects Anthocyanin Content and Related Gene Expression in Berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. Molecules 2017, 22, 283.

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