Molecules 2012, 17(8), 9728-9740; doi:10.3390/molecules17089728
Article

Exposure to Anacardiaceae Volatile Oils and Their Constituents Induces Lipid Peroxidation within Food-Borne Bacteria Cells

1 Department of Chemistry, Federal University of de Viçosa, Viçosa 36570-000, MG, Brazil 2 Federal University of São João del’Rei, Campus Sete Lagoas, Sete Lagoas 35701-970, MG, Brazil 3 Department of Food Technology, Federal University of de Viçosa, Viçosa 36570-000, MG, Brazil 4 School of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, Institute for Health Research, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK 5 Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora 36036-900, MG, Brazil
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 July 2012; in revised form: 27 July 2012 / Accepted: 30 July 2012 / Published: 14 August 2012
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products)
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Abstract: The chemical composition of the volatile oils from five Anacardiaceae species and their activities against Gram positive and negative bacteria were assessed. The peroxidative damage within bacterial cell membranes was determined through the breakdown product malondialdehyde (MDA). The major constituents in Anacardium humile leaves oil were (E)-caryophyllene (31.0%) and α-pinene (22.0%), and in Anacardium occidentale oil they were (E)-caryophyllene (15.4%) and germacrene-D (11.5%). Volatile oil from Astronium fraxinifolium leaves were dominated by (E)-β-ocimene (44.1%) and α-terpinolene (15.2%), whilst the oil from Myracrodruon urundeuva contained an abundance of δ-3-carene (78.8%). However, Schinus terebinthifolius leaves oil collected in March and July presented different chemical compositions. The oils from all species, except the one from A. occidentale, exhibited varying levels of antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Oil extracted in July from S. terebinthifolius was more active against all bacterial strains than the corresponding oil extracted in March. The high antibacterial activity of the M. urundeuva oil could be ascribed to its high δ-3-carene content. The amounts of MDA generated within bacterial cells indicate that the volatile oils induce lipid peroxidation. The results suggest that one putative mechanism of antibacterial action of these volatile oils is pro-oxidant damage within bacterial cell membrane explaining in part their preservative properties.
Keywords: essential oils; δ-3-carene; Anacardiaceae; antibacterial activity; lipid peroxidation

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MDPI and ACS Style

Montanari, R.M.; Barbosa, L.C.A.; Demuner, A.J.; Silva, C.J.; Andrade, N.J.; Ismail, F.M.D.; Barbosa, M.C.A. Exposure to Anacardiaceae Volatile Oils and Their Constituents Induces Lipid Peroxidation within Food-Borne Bacteria Cells. Molecules 2012, 17, 9728-9740.

AMA Style

Montanari RM, Barbosa LCA, Demuner AJ, Silva CJ, Andrade NJ, Ismail FMD, Barbosa MCA. Exposure to Anacardiaceae Volatile Oils and Their Constituents Induces Lipid Peroxidation within Food-Borne Bacteria Cells. Molecules. 2012; 17(8):9728-9740.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Montanari, Ricardo M.; Barbosa, Luiz C. A.; Demuner, Antonio J.; Silva, Cleber J.; Andrade, Nelio J.; Ismail, Fyaz M. D.; Barbosa, Maria C. A. 2012. "Exposure to Anacardiaceae Volatile Oils and Their Constituents Induces Lipid Peroxidation within Food-Borne Bacteria Cells." Molecules 17, no. 8: 9728-9740.

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