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Special Issue "Recent Work on Catholicism"

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A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Steven M. Avella

Department of History, Coughlin Hall, 301, Marquette University, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
E-Mail
Phone: +1 414 288 3556
Interests: US Catholicism; Catholicism in the American West; 20th Century US

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Catholicism is one of the major religious systems of the world. Claiming more than a billion adherents, it has a visible presence on every part of the globe. In recent years interest in religious history has surged among professional historians. The religious experiences of human kind have become a portal to a fuller understanding of individuals, societies, and nations. Catholicism's historic contributions to global culture and its impact on the values and behavior of men and women (not to mention the built environment and material culture) of the past two millenia is the subject of this gathering of historical work. The cross fertilization of Catholic history with the social sciences, the history of theology and the "cultural turn" in recent historiography has produced a vibrant and stimulating burst of new scholarship.

Dr. Steven M. Avella
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Roman Catholicism
  • Catholic church
  • globalization
  • hierarchy
  • Vatican
  • Pope John Paul II
  • Pope Benedict XVI
  • missionaries
  • Vatican II
  • liberation theology
  • media

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-9
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Research

Open AccessArticle Towards A New Reading of the Political Thought of the Dévot Faction: The Opposition to Cardinal Richelieu’s Ministériat
Religions 2013, 4(4), 529-549; doi:10.3390/rel4040529
Received: 27 September 2013 / Revised: 23 October 2013 / Accepted: 25 October 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
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Abstract
For a long time, historiography has considered the political thought of the dévot party, led by Mathieu de Morgues and Michel de Marillac, to be supportive of a traditional monarchy, Catholicism and the extermination of Protestants, while being opposed to the Thirty Years
[...] Read more.
For a long time, historiography has considered the political thought of the dévot party, led by Mathieu de Morgues and Michel de Marillac, to be supportive of a traditional monarchy, Catholicism and the extermination of Protestants, while being opposed to the Thirty Years War. This faction’s political thought has been looked upon as being in contrast to that of Cardinal Richelieu, which was comparatively regarded as profoundly absolutist and modern. Such an understanding of the dévots’ political thought, albeit disputed, continues to prevail. The present article intends to demonstrate that the dévots were in fact on the side of the absolutists, which explains their opposition to Richelieu. Indeed, they never criticized absolutism, but rather, the illegitimate leadership of the government by an all-powerful premier ministre, namely, Richelieu. According to the dévots, the ministériat actually betrayed the very essence of absolute monarchy. Before proposing a new perspective on its political thought, it is important to reflect upon the definition of the dévot party. This will be followed by an overview of the lives and work of the principal representatives of this faction, Mathieu de Morgues (1582–1670) and Michel de Marillac (1560–1632). An examination of the historiography on this subject enables this article’s conclusions to be situated in a broader context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Catholic and Charismatic: A Study in Personality Theory within Catholic Congregations
Religions 2013, 4(2), 267-282; doi:10.3390/rel4020267
Received: 16 February 2013 / Revised: 19 April 2013 / Accepted: 22 April 2013 / Published: 26 April 2013
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Abstract
This study set out to conceptualise and measure Charismatic orientation (openness to charismatic experience) and traditional Catholic orientation (Catholic identity) among a sample of 670 Catholic churchgoers in order to test whether attachment to Catholic Charismatic Renewal strengthened or weakened the sense of
[...] Read more.
This study set out to conceptualise and measure Charismatic orientation (openness to charismatic experience) and traditional Catholic orientation (Catholic identity) among a sample of 670 Catholic churchgoers in order to test whether attachment to Catholic Charismatic Renewal strengthened or weakened the sense of traditional Catholic identity among churchgoing Catholics. This research question was set within the broader consideration of the location of Charismatic orientation and Catholic orientation within Eysenck’s three dimensional model of personality. The data revealed a strong positive association between Charismatic experience and Catholic identity. Higher scores on the index of Charismatic orientation were associated with higher extraversion scores, with higher neuroticism scores, and with higher levels of mass attendance and personal prayer. Higher scores on the index of Catholic orientation were associated with being female, being older, higher neuroticism scores, and higher levels of mass attendance and personal prayer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Determinants of Disaffiliation: An International Study
Religions 2013, 4(1), 166-185; doi:10.3390/rel4010166
Received: 29 January 2013 / Revised: 21 February 2013 / Accepted: 7 March 2013 / Published: 15 March 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (229 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Using a dataset of 15,000 subjects from 32 Western countries, the current study examines individuals who were raised in a certain religion and, at some stage of their lives, left it. Currently, they define their religious affiliation as ‘no religion’. A battery of
[...] Read more.
Using a dataset of 15,000 subjects from 32 Western countries, the current study examines individuals who were raised in a certain religion and, at some stage of their lives, left it. Currently, they define their religious affiliation as ‘no religion’. A battery of explanatory variables (country-specific, personal attributes and marriage variables) was employed to test for determinants of this decision. It was found that the tendency of individuals to leave their religion—the most extreme symptom of secularization—is strongly correlated with their liberal beliefs and with parental and spousal religious characteristics. Moreover, country characteristics, as well as personal socio-demographic features seem to be much less relevant, except for the religious diversity of the country that has a positive effect on disaffiliation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle An Analysis of Foreign Diplomatic Aid to the Catholic Clergy during the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939)
Religions 2013, 4(1), 96-115; doi:10.3390/rel4010096
Received: 30 October 2012 / Revised: 17 January 2013 / Accepted: 21 January 2013 / Published: 5 February 2013
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Abstract
During the European crisis of the thirties of the twentieth century, the most significant persecution of the Catholic Church in the history of Spain was generated. With the ultimate goal of saving lives, the Foreign Diplomatic Corps provided many humanitarian services, the most
[...] Read more.
During the European crisis of the thirties of the twentieth century, the most significant persecution of the Catholic Church in the history of Spain was generated. With the ultimate goal of saving lives, the Foreign Diplomatic Corps provided many humanitarian services, the most important of those the massive granting of diplomatic and consular asylum to more than 11,000 people, including Catholics and clergy. This article analyzes the genesis and realization of this fact and its consequences, which were supposed to maintain and facilitate a clandestine Catholic cult in the Spain of Popular Front. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Flexible Catholicism, Religion and the Church: The Italian Case
Religions 2013, 4(1), 1-13; doi:10.3390/rel4010001
Received: 14 November 2012 / Revised: 13 December 2012 / Accepted: 14 December 2012 / Published: 21 December 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (65 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
What is taking place in the religious field in some Western societies not only seems to reflect a crisis situation or irreversible decline in the church and dominant religious institutions. More than might be imagined, advanced modernity offers opportunities for traditional religions, even
[...] Read more.
What is taking place in the religious field in some Western societies not only seems to reflect a crisis situation or irreversible decline in the church and dominant religious institutions. More than might be imagined, advanced modernity offers opportunities for traditional religions, even within a context fraught with contradictions and ambivalence. An example of this is represented by Italy, which is still today characterized by widespread affiliation to Catholicism, despite the increase in religious pluralism and undisputed secularization in the customs of the population. Comparing surveys carried out in 1994 and 2007 on a sample of the Italian population, the paper presents a version of religious modernity that has emerged both on the individual religious front and in the way religion is considered in the public sphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle When Institutions Collide: The Competing Forces of Hospitals Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Church
Religions 2013, 4(1), 14-29; doi:10.3390/rel4010014
Received: 29 October 2012 / Revised: 13 December 2012 / Accepted: 17 December 2012 / Published: 21 December 2012
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Abstract
For centuries, the Catholic Church has been a major social actor in the provision of health services, particularly health care delivered in hospitals. Through a confluence of powerful environmental forces at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the future of Catholic health care
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For centuries, the Catholic Church has been a major social actor in the provision of health services, particularly health care delivered in hospitals. Through a confluence of powerful environmental forces at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the future of Catholic health care is threatened. Although United States Catholic hospitals are a separate case of private, nonprofit hospitals, they have experienced environmental pressures to compete with other hospital ownership types and, on some dimensions, Catholic hospitals are indistinguishable from other hospitals. This article conceptualizes United States Catholic hospitals as having competing institutional forces that are not always compatible. To keep pace with the changing demands of religion and the social role of the hospital, Catholic hospitals continue to redefine themselves. An adaptive framework is used to explain choices Catholic hospitals may need to make to justify their existence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Priesthood Satisfaction and the Challenges Priests Face: A Case Study of a Rural Diocese in the Philippines
Religions 2012, 3(4), 1103-1119; doi:10.3390/rel3041103
Received: 2 October 2012 / Revised: 16 November 2012 / Accepted: 19 November 2012 / Published: 22 November 2012
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Abstract
This article draws from the experience of Catholic priests based in a rural diocese in the Philippines. It will be argued that their satisfaction as diocesan priests is best understood as a religious emotion in spite of the challenges they face on a
[...] Read more.
This article draws from the experience of Catholic priests based in a rural diocese in the Philippines. It will be argued that their satisfaction as diocesan priests is best understood as a religious emotion in spite of the challenges they face on a daily basis. Their challenges revolve around economic limitation, problems with their bishop and leaders, and relational isolation brought about by social and geographic distance. In spite of these challenges, priest-respondents have asserted that they are satisfied because they are still able to fulfill their vocation as priests and have an impact on the lives of their parishioners. Priesthood satisfaction in this sense is not an individual state of the mind dependent on the environment and circumstances. Instead, priesthood satisfaction can be understood as a religious emotion that allows them to remain faithful to their vocation as Catholic priests. The nuances explored in this article inform and complement the various studies on priesthood in the West. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Allies Advancing Justice: Cooperation between U.S. Bishops and Call to Action to Promote the Peace and Economic Pastoral Letters (1982–1987)
Religions 2012, 3(4), 902-921; doi:10.3390/rel3040902
Received: 3 July 2012 / Revised: 26 September 2012 / Accepted: 29 September 2012 / Published: 1 October 2012
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Abstract
This article discusses a phase of an ongoing relationship between a social movement organization (SMO), Call to Action, and the institutional organization (IO) in which it is embedded, the Catholic Church. Relationships between SMOs and IOs are dynamic. At times they may engage
[...] Read more.
This article discusses a phase of an ongoing relationship between a social movement organization (SMO), Call to Action, and the institutional organization (IO) in which it is embedded, the Catholic Church. Relationships between SMOs and IOs are dynamic. At times they may engage in heated conflict related to the SMO’s goal to reform the IO and the desire of the IO leaders to maintain stability. There can also be times when such relationships are less adversarial and even cooperative. This article draws on periodicals, archival data and interviews to describe and analyze a period (1982–1987) when the values and interests of Call to Action and U.S. Bishops coalesced and led to a period of cooperation in which they together promoted the Peace and Economic Pastoral Letters written by the U.S. Conference of Bishops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)
Open AccessArticle Ecclesial Opposition to Large-Scale Mining on Samar: Neoliberalism Meets the Church of the Poor in a Wounded Land
Religions 2012, 3(3), 833-861; doi:10.3390/rel3030833
Received: 16 July 2012 / Revised: 20 August 2012 / Accepted: 30 August 2012 / Published: 7 September 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (823 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, the government of the Philippines (adhering to the precepts of neoliberalism) has promoted large-scale mining as a method of stimulating economic development. Mining, an activity with substantial potential for environmental harm, is staunchly opposed by the Roman Catholic Church in
[...] Read more.
In recent years, the government of the Philippines (adhering to the precepts of neoliberalism) has promoted large-scale mining as a method of stimulating economic development. Mining, an activity with substantial potential for environmental harm, is staunchly opposed by the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines, particularly on the island of Samar. The crux of the church’s opposition to mining are the adverse environmental consequences that mining may impose upon the rural poor who, engaging in subsistence agriculture and aquaculture, are vitally dependent upon access to natural resources. Should there be a mining-related environmental disruption, these people will be thrust from subsistence into destitution. The commitment of the church to act on behalf of the poor emanates from the conciliar documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965), the fertile ground for liberation theology in the Philippines provided by the Marcos dictatorship (1972–1986), and by the commitment of the church in its 1992 Second Plenary Council to become a church of the poor. Samar contains quality mineralization set amid a wealth of biodiversity, grinding poverty, a simmering Maoist insurgency, and a vulnerability to natural hazards such as typhoons and El Niño induced drought. The opposition of the church to mining on Samar demonstrates the commitment of the church to be a church of the poor and how this praxis stands in contradistinction to the intellectual hegemony of neoliberalism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Work on Catholicism)

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