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Special Issue "Polymers for Bioimaging"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kevin D. Belfield

College of Science and Liberal Arts, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 504 Cullimore Hall, 323 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd Newark, NJ 07102
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 973-596-3676
Fax: +1 973-596-6063
Interests: multiphoton absorbing materials; two-photon photochemistry; in vivo and ex vivo two-photon fluorescence bioimaging; magnetic polymeric and sol-gel nanocomposites; site-specific fluorophore labeling; fluorescent-based sensors and bioimaging probes; photodynamic therapy agents; nanostructured functional organic and polymeric materials; two-photon based 3D high density optical data storage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioimaging is playing an ever-increasing role in disease diagnosis and progression as well as for image guided surgery and monitoring the efficacy of various therapies. The requirements of probes for bioimaging include high target selectivity, high stability, low cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, and high contrast. This often require new materials and approaches. Among the most promising materials for bioimaging are polymer-based probes as the polymer architecture affords the possibility of tuning solubility, incorporating numerous probes and probe types, and, significantly, multivalency of targeting moieties that often enhances selectivity. This special issue focuses on Polymers for Bioimaging, representing both a timely and very important contribution to the science and technology of bioimaging. Contributions that represent different polymer classifications and macromolecular strategies are welcome as are studies of polymer-based material employed in bioimaging ranging from optical, X-ray, and photoacoustic methods to magnetic resonance imaging and electron microscopy.

Prof. Dr. Kevin D. Belfield
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • bioimaging
  • polymer probes
  • block copolymers
  • microscopy imaging
  • fluorescence imaging
  • magnetic resonance imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Superparamagnetic Nanocomposites Templated with Pyrazole-Containing Diblock Copolymers
Polymers 2012, 4(2), 1211-1225; doi:10.3390/polym4021211
Received: 19 March 2012 / Revised: 26 April 2012 / Accepted: 14 May 2012 / Published: 31 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (611 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Monodisperse maghemite nanoparticles, templated in novel, well-defined pyrazole-containing norbornene-based block copolymers, provided a superparamagnetic nanocomposite with high saturation magnetization at room temperature under an applied magnetic field. The synthesis of the polymer nanocomposites and physical, morphological, and magnetic chracaterization of the nanocomposites are
[...] Read more.
Monodisperse maghemite nanoparticles, templated in novel, well-defined pyrazole-containing norbornene-based block copolymers, provided a superparamagnetic nanocomposite with high saturation magnetization at room temperature under an applied magnetic field. The synthesis of the polymer nanocomposites and physical, morphological, and magnetic chracaterization of the nanocomposites are reported. Micelle-encapsulated superparamagnetic nanocomposites were generated for dispersal in aqueous medium. Their stability in water in the presence of a magnetic field was investigated as was their morphology and cell viability, strongly suggesting the potential of these superparamagnetic polymer-based nanocomposites in certain biomedical imaging and associated applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Bioimaging)
Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Packaging of Flexible Polymeric Microantennae for in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Polymers 2012, 4(1), 656-673; doi:10.3390/polym4010656
Received: 23 December 2011 / Revised: 14 January 2012 / Accepted: 15 February 2012 / Published: 27 February 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (568 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we detail how microantennae dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can benefit from the advantages offered by polymer substrates, especially flexibility and dielectric properties. We present a monolithic and wireless design based on the transmission lines between conductor windings on
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we detail how microantennae dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can benefit from the advantages offered by polymer substrates, especially flexibility and dielectric properties. We present a monolithic and wireless design based on the transmission lines between conductor windings on both sides of a dielectric substrate and its fabrication process. This last one requires specific plasma treatments to improve polymer/metal adhesion. We have led a comparative study on the effects of the ageing time on the wettability and the metal adhesion to Kapton and Teflon surfaces. Correlation between wettability (water contact angle) and adhesion (tensile strength) has been established. Then, the use of PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) as biocompatible packaging material and the optimization of its thickness allows us to conserve suitable f0 and Q values in a conducting environment such as the biological tissues. These studies allow us to perform 7 Tesla in vivo MRI of the rat brain with a high spatial resolution of 100 x 100 x 200 µm3 and a Signal to Noise Ratio of 80. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Bioimaging)
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