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Special Issue "Electrospinning Techniques and Novel Applications of Electrospun Nanofibers"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ton Peijs (Website)

School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, E1 4NS, London, UK
Fax: +44 20 8981 9804
Interests: nanocomposites; polymer composites; structure/processing/properties relationships of polymer composites; polymer fibres; conductive polymer composites; self-reinforced polymers; cellulose; biobased materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Fabrication of Pd Doped WO3 Nanofiber as Hydrogen Sensor
Polymers 2013, 5(1), 45-55; doi:10.3390/polym5010045
Received: 18 November 2012 / Revised: 10 December 2012 / Accepted: 25 December 2012 / Published: 10 January 2013
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (1138 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pd doped WO3 fibers were synthesized by electro-spinning. The sol gel method was employed to prepare peroxopolytungstic acid (P-PTA). Palladium chloride and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) was dissolved in the sol Pd:WO3 = 10% molar ratio. The prepared sol was loaded [...] Read more.
Pd doped WO3 fibers were synthesized by electro-spinning. The sol gel method was employed to prepare peroxopolytungstic acid (P-PTA). Palladium chloride and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) was dissolved in the sol Pd:WO3 = 10% molar ratio. The prepared sol was loaded into a syringe connected to a high voltage of 18.3 kV and electrospun fibers were collected on the alumina substrates. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were used to analyze the crystal structure and chemical composition of the fibers after heat treatment at 500 °C. Resistance-sensing measurements exhibited a sensitivity of about 30 at 500 ppm hydrogen in air, and the response and recovery times were about 20 and 30 s, respectively, at 300 °C. Hydrogen gas sensing mechanism of the sensor was also studied. Full article
Open AccessArticle Physical Properties of Polypeptide Electrospun Nanofiber Cell Culture Scaffolds on a Wettable Substrate
Polymers 2012, 4(3), 1535-1553; doi:10.3390/polym4031535
Received: 20 April 2012 / Revised: 9 August 2012 / Accepted: 23 August 2012 / Published: 31 August 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1594 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Physical properties of poly(L-ornithine) (PLO), a polycation, poly(L-glutamic acid4-co-L-tyrosine) (PLEY), a polyanion, and electrospun fibers made of these polymers have been determined and compared. The polymers adopted random coil-like conformations in aqueous feedstocks at neutral pH and in [...] Read more.
Physical properties of poly(L-ornithine) (PLO), a polycation, poly(L-glutamic acid4-co-L-tyrosine) (PLEY), a polyanion, and electrospun fibers made of these polymers have been determined and compared. The polymers adopted random coil-like conformations in aqueous feedstocks at neutral pH and in dehydrated cast films and fibers on glass, and the fibers comprised numerous counterions, according to spectral analysis. Adsorption of model proteins and serum proteins onto hydrated and crosslinked fibers depended on the electrical charge of the proteins and the fibers. The surface charge density of the fibers will be comparable to, but less than, the charge density on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of usual eukaryotic cells. The present analysis thus advances understanding of cell behavior on electrospun fiber scaffolds, a topic of considerable current interest. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Tailoring Crystallinity of Electrospun Plla Fibres by Control of Electrospinning Parameters
Polymers 2012, 4(3), 1331-1348; doi:10.3390/polym4031331
Received: 6 June 2012 / Accepted: 20 June 2012 / Published: 28 June 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (1293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The effects of various electrospinning process parameters on the thermal properties, especially the crystallinity of the electrospun fibers were investigated. Thermal analysis of the fibers revealed that they exhibited degree of crystallinity ranging from [...] Read more.
Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The effects of various electrospinning process parameters on the thermal properties, especially the crystallinity of the electrospun fibers were investigated. Thermal analysis of the fibers revealed that they exhibited degree of crystallinity ranging from 23% to 46% while that for the as-received granules was approximately 37%, suggesting that the crystallinity of electrospun PLLA fibres can be controlled by optimizing the electrospinning process. This finding is very important because crystallinity affects polymer properties such as degradation, stiffness, yield stress, modulus and tensile strength, solubility, optical and electrical properties which will in turn affect the behavior of these materials when they are utilized in energy, environment, defense and security applications. The results presented in this paper show that the degree of crystallinity of the electrospun fibers decreased with increasing the polymer solution concentration. Furthermore, an optimum electrospinning voltage at which maximum degree of crystallinity can be obtained was observed. At voltages higher or lower than the optimum electrospinning voltage, the degree of crystallinity will decrease or increase, respectively. The effect of the needle tip to collector distance (NTCD) on the degree of crystallinity follows no predictable and consistent pattern. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers
Polymers 2013, 5(1), 19-44; doi:10.3390/polym5010019
Received: 11 October 2012 / Revised: 3 December 2012 / Accepted: 25 December 2012 / Published: 7 January 2013
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (3318 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of [...] Read more.
Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials. Full article

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