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Special Issue "Graphene"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Owen J. Guy

College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA28PP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: graphene biosensors; device processing; silicon nanowires; silicon carbide; microfluidics; FET biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The isolation of the “wonder material” graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, by Geim and Novoselov, has led to intensive research into graphene, its properties and applications, across a variety of disciplines. Following numerous publications outlining its fundamental physical properties, new devices are being realised that are setting new standards and shifting paradigms in areas such as electronics.

Graphene’s unique properties include: very high charge carrier mobility, the ability to tune its carrier density (and Fermi level), excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, superior optical transparency and mechanical strength, high surface area, and surface sensitivity.

Developments in material growth technology, leading to high mobility, uniform and large area graphene are facilitating a plethora of applications including: electronic applications (devices, displays, transparent electrodes, high-frequency devices); environmental applications (catalysis, water splitting, solar fuels, water purification); energy generation and conversion (fuel cell, solar cells, thermal energy conversion, and thermal management devices); energy storage (batteries, super capacitors); and sensors (optoelectronic sensors, chemical sensors, and biosensors).

Many of the potential applications of graphene are enhanced by the ability to modify (functionalize) its surface chemistry. Surface modification can be used to introduce a bandgap into graphene, to tailor its surface properties including adhesion, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and surface binding. These surface properties are critical in everything from graphene composites to graphene sensors.

Abstracts related to experimentally demonstrated graphene materials and devices are solicited. This includes interdisciplinary topics related to the materials science, chemistry, biotechnology, physics, mechanics, and engineering of 2D materials, such as graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides, silicene, and others. Papers demonstrating graphene devices, device processing, characterization, and applications are particularly welcomed.

Contributed papers are solicited in the following areas:

  • Synthesis and processing of graphene, including large-domain graphene, reduced graphene oxide and graphene functionalization
  • Layer transfer techniques
  • Characterization including novel techniques and experimental tools
  • processing, modification and characterization of Graphene and other 2D-layerd materials
  • Graphene doping
  • Surface modification (functionalisation of graphene)
  • Electronic devices and structures
  • Graphene composites
  • Graphene inks
  • Graphene and 2D-layered materials applications and devices (including electronic devices and structures, optoelectronic devices)
  • Energy generation and storage applications
  • Graphene and graphene nanocomposites for catalysis
  • Graphene sensors and biosensors

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to let us know.

Best Regards,
Dr. Owen J Guy
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • graphene
  • 2D materials
  • growth
  • processing
  • characterization
  • sensors
  • devices
  • applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Buckling Behavior of Substrate Supported Graphene Sheets
Materials 2016, 9(1), 32; doi:10.3390/ma9010032
Received: 10 October 2015 / Revised: 8 December 2015 / Accepted: 17 December 2015 / Published: 7 January 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2717 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis.
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The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis. From 70 simulation cases of simple-supported graphene sheets with different sizes under uniaxial compression, two different buckling modes are investigated and revealed to be dominated by the graphene size. Especially, for graphene sheets with length larger than 3 nm and width larger than 1.1 nm, the buckling mode depends only on the length/width ratio. Besides, it is revealed that the existence of graphene substrate can increase the critical buckling stress and strain to 4.39 N/m and 1.58%, respectively, which are about 10 times those for free-standing graphene sheets. Moreover, for graphene sheets with common size (longer than 20 nm), both theoretical and simulation results show that the critical buckling stress and strain are dominated only by the adhesive interactions with substrate and independent of the graphene size. Results in this work provide valuable insight and guidelines for the design and application of graphene-derived materials and nano-electromechanical systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Raman Spectra of Luminescent Graphene Oxide (GO)-Phosphor Hybrid Nanoscrolls
Materials 2015, 8(12), 8460-8466; doi:10.3390/ma8125470
Received: 20 October 2015 / Revised: 27 November 2015 / Accepted: 30 November 2015 / Published: 4 December 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2773 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Graphene oxide (GO)-phosphor hybrid nanoscrolls were synthesized using a simple chemical method. The GO-phosphor ratio was varied to find the optimum ratio for enhanced optical characteristics of the hybrid. A scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that synthesized GO scrolls achieved a length of
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Graphene oxide (GO)-phosphor hybrid nanoscrolls were synthesized using a simple chemical method. The GO-phosphor ratio was varied to find the optimum ratio for enhanced optical characteristics of the hybrid. A scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that synthesized GO scrolls achieved a length of over 20 μm with interior cavities. The GO-phosphor hybrid is extensively analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, suggesting that various Raman combination modes are activated with the appearance of a low-frequency radial breathing-like mode (RBLM) of the type observed in carbon nanotubes. All of the synthesized GO-phosphor hybrids exhibit an intense luminescent emission around 540 nm along with a broad emission at approximately 400 nm, with the intensity ratio varying with the GO-phosphor ratio. The photoluminescence emissions were gauged using Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates and at an optimum ratio. The coordinates shift to the white region of the color spectra. Our study suggests that the GO-phosphor hybrid nanoscrolls are suitable candidates for light-emitting applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene)
Open AccessArticle First-Principles Investigation of Adsorption and Diffusion of Ions on Pristine, Defective and B-doped Graphene
Materials 2015, 8(9), 6163-6178; doi:10.3390/ma8095297
Received: 21 July 2015 / Revised: 24 August 2015 / Accepted: 28 August 2015 / Published: 15 September 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (5741 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We performed first-principles calculations to reveal the possibility of applying pristine, defective, and B-doped graphene in feasible negative electrode materials of ion batteries. It is found that the barriers for ions are too high to diffuse through the original graphene, however the reduced
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We performed first-principles calculations to reveal the possibility of applying pristine, defective, and B-doped graphene in feasible negative electrode materials of ion batteries. It is found that the barriers for ions are too high to diffuse through the original graphene, however the reduced barriers are obtained by introducing defects (single vacancy, double vacancy, Stone–Wales defect) in the graphene. Among the three types of defects, the systems with a double vacancy could provide the lowest barriers of 1.49 and 6.08 eV for Li and Na, respectively. Furthermore, for all kinds of B-doped graphene with the vacancy, the systems with a double vacancy could also provide the lowest adsorption energies and diffusion barriers. Therefore, undoped and B-doped graphene with a double vacancy turn out to be the most promising candidates that can replace pristine graphene for anode materials in ion batteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene)
Open AccessArticle Development of Graphene Nano-Platelet Based Counter Electrodes for Solar Cells
Materials 2015, 8(9), 5953-5973; doi:10.3390/ma8095284
Received: 12 June 2015 / Revised: 23 August 2015 / Accepted: 27 August 2015 / Published: 7 September 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1945 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Graphene has been envisaged as a highly promising material for various field emission devices, supercapacitors, photocatalysts, sensors, electroanalytical systems, fuel cells and photovoltaics. The main goal of our work is to develop new Pt and transparent conductive oxide (TCO) free graphene based counter
[...] Read more.
Graphene has been envisaged as a highly promising material for various field emission devices, supercapacitors, photocatalysts, sensors, electroanalytical systems, fuel cells and photovoltaics. The main goal of our work is to develop new Pt and transparent conductive oxide (TCO) free graphene based counter electrodes (CEs) for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We have prepared new composites which are based on graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and conductive polymers such as poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Films of these composites were deposited on non-conductive pristine glass substrates and used as CEs for DSSCs which were fabricated by the “open cell” approach. The electrical conductivity studies have clearly demonstrated that the addition of GNPs into PEDOT:PSS films resulted in a significant increase of the electrical conductivity of the composites. The highest solar energy conversion efficiency was achieved for CEs comprising of GNPs with the highest conductivity (190 S/cm) and n-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) treated PEDOT:PSS in a composite film. The performance of this cell (4.29% efficiency) compares very favorably to a DSSC with a standard commercially available Pt and TCO based CE (4.72% efficiency in the same type of open DSSC) and is a promising replacement material for the conventional Pt and TCO based CE in DSSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene)

Review

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Open AccessReview Graphene-Based Materials for Stem Cell Applications
Materials 2015, 8(12), 8674-8690; doi:10.3390/ma8125481
Received: 30 September 2015 / Revised: 18 November 2015 / Accepted: 1 December 2015 / Published: 11 December 2015
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (5460 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although graphene and its derivatives have been proven to be suitable for several biomedical applications such as for cancer therapy and biosensing, the use of graphene for stem cell research is a relatively new area that has only recently started to be investigated.
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Although graphene and its derivatives have been proven to be suitable for several biomedical applications such as for cancer therapy and biosensing, the use of graphene for stem cell research is a relatively new area that has only recently started to be investigated. For stem cell applications, graphene has been utilized by itself or in combination with other types of materials such as nanoparticles, nanofibers, and polymer scaffolds to take advantage of the several unique properties of graphene, such as the flexibility in size, shape, hydrophilicity, as well as its excellent biocompatibility. In this review, we will highlight a number of previous studies that have investigated the potential of graphene or its derivatives for stem cell applications, with a particular focus on guiding stem cell differentiation into specific lineages (e.g., osteogenesis, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis), promoting stem cell growth, stem cell delivery/transplantation, and effective monitoring of their differentiation. We hope that this review promotes and accelerates the use of graphene-based materials for regenerative therapies, especially for stem cell-based approaches to cure various incurable diseases/disorders such as neurological diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease), stroke, spinal cord injuries, bone/cartilage defects, and cardiovascular diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene)
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