Special Issue "Biomaterials for Wound Healing"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rosalind S. Labow

Division of Cardiac Surgery, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, ON K1Y 4W7, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 6137614010
Interests: mechanisms of cell-material interaction; mechanical strain in monocyte-derived macrophage-mediated biodegradation of polyurethane medical devices; cell signaling in mucosal inflammation and pain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Journal of Functional Biomaterials is requesting submission of articles for the special issue “Biomaterials for Wound Healing”.  The use of biomaterials for wound healing can include materials for tissue engineering for replacement of skin, bone and cartilage, cornea and blood vessel grafts as well as cardiac patches.  Both synthetic materials such as polyurethanes and natural materials such as collagen hydrogels should be considered. Wound healing materials can also include drug delivery systems as well as anti-microbials incorporated into polymer structures. The scope of the journal will also include studies concerning the mechanism of action of biomaterials in controlling the foreign body reaction. The effect of materials on macrophage phenotype as well as foreign body giant cell formation that ultimately control the wound healing outcome will also be a focus. Additional factors to be considered in the articles submitted include the individual host response, implant location, size, shape, micromotion, surface chemistry, surface roughness, and porosity. Characteristics of the host, such as age and general health, also affect response to an implant. It is anticipated that this special issue will provide a greater understanding of the foreign body response to biomaterials that influences normal wound healing leading to the design of more biocompatible materials and devices.

Prof. Dr. Rosalind S. Labow
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • synthetic materials
  • natural materials
  • tissue engineering
  • anti-microbials
  • foreign body reaction
  • macrophages
  • foreign body giant cells

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Potentials of Chitosan-Based Delivery Systems in Wound Therapy: Bioadhesion Study
J. Funct. Biomater. 2012, 3(1), 37-48; doi:10.3390/jfb3010037
Received: 6 October 2011 / Revised: 9 November 2011 / Accepted: 27 December 2011 / Published: 6 January 2012
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (351 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chitosan is currently proposed to be one of the most promising polymers in wound dressing development. Our research focuses on its potential as a vehicle for nano-delivery systems destined for burn therapy. One of the most important features of wound dressing is its
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Chitosan is currently proposed to be one of the most promising polymers in wound dressing development. Our research focuses on its potential as a vehicle for nano-delivery systems destined for burn therapy. One of the most important features of wound dressing is its bioadhesion to the wounded site. We compared the bioadhesive properties of chitosan with those of Carbopol, a synthetic origin polymer. Chitosan-based hydrogels of different molecular weights were first analyzed by texture analysis for gel cohesiveness, adhesiveness and hardness. In vitro release studies showed no difference in release of model antimicrobial drug from the different hydrogel formulations. Bioadhesion tests were performed on pig ear skin and the detachment force, necessary to remove the die from the skin, and the amount of remaining formulation on the skin were determined. Although no significant difference regarding detachment force could be seen between Carbopol-based and chitosan-based formulations, almost double the amount of chitosan formulation remained on the skin as compared to Carbopol formulations. The findings confirmed the great potential of chitosan-based delivery systems in advanced wound therapy. Moreover, results suggest that formulation retention on the ex vivo skin samples could provide deeper insight on formulation bioadhesiveness than the determination of detachment force. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Wound Healing)
Open AccessArticle Thrombin Production and Human Neutrophil Elastase Sequestration by Modified Cellulosic Dressings and Their Electrokinetic Analysis
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(4), 391-413; doi:10.3390/jfb2040391
Received: 26 September 2011 / Revised: 3 December 2011 / Accepted: 7 December 2011 / Published: 15 December 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (730 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation
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Wound healing is a complex series of biochemical and cellular events. Optimally, functional material design addresses the overlapping acute and inflammatory stages of wound healing based on molecular, cellular, and bio-compatibility issues. In this paper the issues addressed are uncontrolled hemostasis and inflammation which can interfere with the orderly flow of wound healing. In this regard, we review the serine proteases thrombin and elastase relative to dressing functionality that improves wound healing and examine the effects of charge in cotton/cellulosic dressing design on thrombin production and elastase sequestration (uptake by the wound dressing). Thrombin is central to the initiation and propagation of coagulation, and elastase is released from neutrophils that can function detrimentally in a stalled inflammatory phase characteristic of chronic wounds. Electrokinetic fiber surface properties of the biomaterials of this study were determined to correlate material charge and polarity with function relative to thrombin production and elastase sequestration. Human neutrophil elastase sequestration was assessed with an assay representative of chronic wound concentration with cotton gauze cross-linked with three types of polycarboxylic acids and one phosphorylation finish; thrombin production, which was assessed in a plasma-based assay via a fluorogenic peptide substrate, was determined for cotton, cotton-grafted chitosan, chitosan, rayon/polyester, and two kaolin-treated materials including a commercial hemorrhage control dressing (QuickClot Combat Gauze). A correlation in thrombin production to zeta potential was found. Two polycarboxylic acid cross linked and a phosphorylated cotton dressing gave high elastase sequestration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Wound Healing)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Protein Degradation and Protection Observed in the Presence of Novel Wound Dressing Components
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(4), 338-354; doi:10.3390/jfb2040338
Received: 6 October 2011 / Revised: 23 November 2011 / Accepted: 24 November 2011 / Published: 2 December 2011
PDF Full-text (334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chronic wounds typically have excessive levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and proinflammatory cytokines that impair healing. Reducing these detrimental proteins may be key to healing chronic wounds. Proprietary protease blends were formulated specifically to degrade excessive amounts of proinflammatory factors that could prevent
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Chronic wounds typically have excessive levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and proinflammatory cytokines that impair healing. Reducing these detrimental proteins may be key to healing chronic wounds. Proprietary protease blends were formulated specifically to degrade excessive amounts of proinflammatory factors that could prevent wound healing. Applications of protease-containing wound dressings to acute and chronic wounds have been observed clinically to resolve inflammation and appear to aid healing. The purpose of this study was to test in vitro a deliberate blend of proteases for the ability to deactivate or activate known proteins associated with inflammation or healing. Purified human target proteins were incubated with test and control solutions and samples removed at various time points. Blinded samples were tested using a novel infrared protein multiplex sandwich-ELISA-type array technique. Many proinflammatory proteins such as MMPs, cytokines and chemokines were susceptible to degradation. Many proteins such as growth factors, cytokines and TIMP1 were resistant to degradation. Not all proinflammatory proteins were deactivated. Family protein structure did not appear to affect susceptibility to degradation or deactivation. These results suggest that specific protease containing wound dressings appear to reduce multiple detrimental components which may disrupt their deleterious effects on the wound bed and microenvironment. By improving the wound microenvironment through the use of definitive proteases, these novel wound dressings may help transition wounds into the subsequent phase of healing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Wound Healing)
Open AccessArticle Self-Assembled Matrix by Umbilical Cord Stem Cells
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(3), 213-229; doi:10.3390/jfb2030213
Received: 3 August 2011 / Revised: 23 August 2011 / Accepted: 25 August 2011 / Published: 1 September 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1002 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Corneal integrity is critical for vision. Corneal wounds frequently heal with scarring that impairs vision. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (cord stem cells) have been investigated for tissue engineering and therapy due to their availability and differentiation potential. In this study,
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Corneal integrity is critical for vision. Corneal wounds frequently heal with scarring that impairs vision. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (cord stem cells) have been investigated for tissue engineering and therapy due to their availability and differentiation potential. In this study, we used cord stem cells in a 3-dimensional (3D) stroma-like model to observe extracellular matrix organization, with human corneal fibroblasts acting as a control. For 4 weeks, the cells were stimulated with a stable Vitamin C (VitC) derivative ±TGF-b1. After 4 weeks, the mean thickness of the constructs was ~30 mm; however, cord stem cell constructs had 50% less cells per unit volume, indicating the formation of a dense matrix. We found minimal change in decorin and lumican mRNA, and a significant increase in perlecan mRNA in the presence of TGF-b1. Keratocan on the other hand decreased with TGF-b1 in both cell lineages. With both cell types, the constructs possessed aligned collagen fibrils and associated glycosaminoglycans. Fibril diameters did not change with TGF-b1 stimulation or cell lineage; however, highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans associated with the collagen fibrils significantly increased with TGF-b1. Overall, we have shown that cord stem cells can secrete their own extracellular matrix and promote the deposition and sulfation of various proteoglycans. Furthermore, these cells are at least comparable to commonly used corneal fibroblasts and present an alternative for the 3D in vitro tissue engineered model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomaterials for Wound Healing)

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