Special Issue "Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Annabel Martín

Associate Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, Women's Gender and Sexualities Studies, and Comparative Literature Program, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 603 646 2599
Interests: contemporary Spanish cultural studies; European and Spanish literature and film; Basque culture; feminism in Spain; mass culture and politics; nationalism and dictatorship; globalization, tourism, and immigration in Spain; gender and higher education, gender and neoliberalism
Co-Guest Editor
Ms. Han Suh

Dartmouth College, 6256 Hinman Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation” is a Special Issue dedicated to feminist methodologies that highlight the productive outcomes of crisis, contradiction, and fracture. Taken together, the essays model a type of "disaggregate thinking" (Angela Davis, 2011), whereby things that appear to be separate are thought together and where natural, common-sense connections are made uncomfortably less so. The essays deal with the struggles of social change in a wide array of areas that range from higher education to welfare activists, from queer gardens of memory to new models of citizenship, from gender violence to the school-to-prison pipeline, from community activism to the brutal effects of neoliberal economic policies on dignity and quality of life.  These articles offer an imaginary for change that is multidimensional and based on a tense dialogue between the different axes that mold the strands of experiences that structure our lives, knowledge that crosses and questions facile identity lines, that unites and disaggregates in a contestatory and transformative fashion.

Prof. Dr. Annabel Martín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • crisis
  • social change
  • feminism
  • higher education
  • citizenship
  • neoliberalism
  • arts and humanities
  • gender violence
  • civil rights
  • AIDS
  • memory

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Searching for a Common Place: Thoughts on Crisis, Marginality, and Social Change
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 40; doi:10.3390/h6020040
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 10 June 2017 / Accepted: 10 June 2017 / Published: 14 June 2017
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Abstract
This essay describes our neoliberal moment of crisis as a displacement of meaning regarding the more established notions of margin-center. Our times paradoxically ‘unite’ in that we are unwittingly governed by a financial logic that privileges personal gain over collective well-being. With this
[...] Read more.
This essay describes our neoliberal moment of crisis as a displacement of meaning regarding the more established notions of margin-center. Our times paradoxically ‘unite’ in that we are unwittingly governed by a financial logic that privileges personal gain over collective well-being. With this in mind, the essay will discuss strategies for examining oppression and imagining progress that is multidimensional and intersectional and thinks about the contestatory power in political and intellectual discourses that are linked to a multi-layered, feminist-gendered perspective in order to point to avenues that might lead to incisive political transformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Crisis and Consumption: ‘Saving’ the Poor and the Seductions of Capitalism
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 36; doi:10.3390/h6020036
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 26 May 2017 / Accepted: 27 May 2017 / Published: 2 June 2017
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Abstract
This article examines the crisis of capitalist seduction through the lens of online shopping platforms that raise funds for international assistance organizations and development celebrity advertising. Consumer-based giving has altered the commodity fetish into cliché, subsequently masking the capitalist produced crisis of endemic
[...] Read more.
This article examines the crisis of capitalist seduction through the lens of online shopping platforms that raise funds for international assistance organizations and development celebrity advertising. Consumer-based giving has altered the commodity fetish into cliché, subsequently masking the capitalist produced crisis of endemic poverty and global inequality. Celebrity supported consumer-based giving and product advertising are used to illustrate the seductions of capitalism. This article argues that international assistance organizations are embedded in the substance and lifeblood of capitalisms’ dependence on inequality and poverty to generate profits/wealth. Consumer driven assistance remains a pervasive crisis hidden by seductive shopping platforms camouflaged as compassion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Crisis, Change, and the Humanities: Parameters of Discussion
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 35; doi:10.3390/h6020035
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 19 May 2017 / Accepted: 30 May 2017 / Published: 1 June 2017
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Abstract
Dynamic metacritical, systemic, paradigmatic thinking about our times is a direct outcome of the work of the humanistic disciplines, for they provide us with the language to understand the operative and abusive functioning of power and inequality. The humanities also teach us that
[...] Read more.
Dynamic metacritical, systemic, paradigmatic thinking about our times is a direct outcome of the work of the humanistic disciplines, for they provide us with the language to understand the operative and abusive functioning of power and inequality. The humanities also teach us that we internalize these systemic operations as new contradictory “locations”, as new experiences of space and identity, that destabilize and make more difficult our need to feel anchored in our social realities. This prefatory essay outlines a pertinent paradigmatic framing of our neoliberal context and reclaims higher education’s key role in the development of democratic traditions of civic engagement. It offers a hopeful regeneration of our times of crisis through the work of the humanities and highlights the long tradition of cultural critique already in place in gender-sensitive disciplines that opt for a reimagining of the future grounded on social change and justice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Times of Crisis, Seeds of Modernity: Women and Popular Revolts in Modern Spain
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 30; doi:10.3390/h6020030
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 30 April 2017 / Accepted: 3 May 2017 / Published: 14 May 2017
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Abstract
In the 18th century, nations began acknowledging the presence of those who belonged to inferior classes and regarding them as the constitutive political subject of the modern state. Paradoxically, even as these marginal individuals were turned into central figures of the state’s political
[...] Read more.
In the 18th century, nations began acknowledging the presence of those who belonged to inferior classes and regarding them as the constitutive political subject of the modern state. Paradoxically, even as these marginal individuals were turned into central figures of the state’s political apparatus, they plunged the notion of sovereignty into crisis as they questioned the status quo and embodied an alternative to institutional power. In this light, the present essay explores the idea of crisis and modernity in the Spanish context from a historical, spatial, and gendered perspective. Women occupy a central space as a minority collective at the margins of the citizenry. But with their action and participation in mutinies, wars and revolutions—all landmarks of state crisis—they make themselves visible and open new spaces of agency from which to disrupt and renew traditional norms. By analyzing 18th- and 19th-century newspaper articles, literary works, and a number of visual representations by Spanish painter Francisco de Goya, this essay will examine the power of art to reveal how crises allow women to emerge as political subjects and to rewrite a narrative of modernity in which they take the leading role in propelling social change, influencing projects of political citizenship, and shaping a modern nation that needs to tend to all its members, making evident that crisis, while a break in the established order, is also a liberating step towards emancipation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle “Modern Nature”: Derek Jarman’s Garden
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 22; doi:10.3390/h6020022
Received: 14 February 2017 / Accepted: 5 April 2017 / Published: 12 April 2017
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Abstract
The queer filmmaker, artist, activist, and gardener, Derek Jarman, when diagnosed with AIDS in 1986, turned to what may seem like an unlikely form of political and aesthetic expression. His eventually world-famous garden allowed him symbolically and aesthetically to address the political issues
[...] Read more.
The queer filmmaker, artist, activist, and gardener, Derek Jarman, when diagnosed with AIDS in 1986, turned to what may seem like an unlikely form of political and aesthetic expression. His eventually world-famous garden allowed him symbolically and aesthetically to address the political issues with which he had always passionately concerned himself: environmental degradation, nuclear expansion, homophobia, consumer culture, and AIDS. Each of these issues entailed a crisis of political response in the late twentieth century, and in the garden, Jarman addresses this crisis on a number of levels, but always as elements of a terminal condition without any prospect of a “cure.” Using literary analysis to examine the garden and Jarman’s writing about it, in addition to a cultural studies perspective to place these topics in a broad context, this essay undertakes a study of the garden’s codes and effects. Consulting Sarah Ensor and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, both of whom describe terminality as a temporality with its own powers and ways of being, I focus on Jarman’s efforts in what he acknowledges as a damaged, post-natural landscape. Rather than seeing crisis only as a moment of emergency, Jarman imagines other more reflective responses to crisis that, I argue, complement more interventionist approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Moving Beyond Retribution: Alternatives to Punishment in a Society Dominated by the School-to-Prison Pipeline
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 15; doi:10.3390/h6020015
Received: 14 February 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
There is a growing national trend in which children and adolescents are funneled out of the public school system and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems—where students are treated as criminals in the schools themselves and are expected to fall into this
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There is a growing national trend in which children and adolescents are funneled out of the public school system and into the juvenile and criminal justice systems—where students are treated as criminals in the schools themselves and are expected to fall into this pattern rather than even attempt to seek opportunities to fulfill the ever elusive “American Dream”. There is a blatant injustice happening in our schools, places that ironically should be considered safe havens, places for knowledge, and means of escape for children who have already been failed by the system and sequestered to under-resourced, overcrowded, and over-surveilled inner cities. Focusing on the damage the public education system has caused and the ways in which policies and practices have effectively made the school-to-prison pipeline a likely trajectory for many Black and Latinx students, we hope to convey the urgency of this crisis and expose the ways in which our youth are stifled, repeatedly, by this form of systematic injustice. We will describe models of restorative justice practices—both within and beyond the classroom—and hope to convey how no matter how well intentioned, they are not adequate solutions to a phenomenon tied to neoliberal ideologies. Thus, we ultimately aim to exemplify how a feminist approach to education would radically restructure the system as we know it, truly creating a path out of this crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessArticle Identity, Power, and the California Welfare-Rights Struggle, 1963–1975
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 14; doi:10.3390/h6020014
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 15 March 2017 / Accepted: 29 March 2017 / Published: 2 April 2017
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Abstract
This article explores the work of welfare-rights activists in 1960s and 70s California. These activists were mostly working-class black and some white mothers, and the majority of them were themselves welfare recipients. As welfare recipients, women of color, and working-class people, they faced
[...] Read more.
This article explores the work of welfare-rights activists in 1960s and 70s California. These activists were mostly working-class black and some white mothers, and the majority of them were themselves welfare recipients. As welfare recipients, women of color, and working-class people, they faced a wave of policies and ideologies that stigmatized them, policed their behavior, and made receiving benefits increasingly difficult. These policies were but one element of a larger political crisis, wherein the California government stoked racialized and gendered fears in order to shrink the welfare state. Rather than simply acquiesce to this reality, welfare-rights groups in California refused to accept it. Though scholars have studied welfare-rights groups in Washington, D.C., Nevada, New York, and other US states, almost no attention has been given to groups in California. In this article I use state legislation, newspaper articles, organizational records, and archived interviews to illustrate how California’s welfare-rights movement challenged anti-welfare policy and ideology. I argue that they did more than simply reject punitive legislation. They emphasized childcare, rebuked middle-class complacency, questioned the primacy of the nuclear family, and dismissed gender roles. In the process, they raised crucial, enduring questions about the nature of economic-justice organizing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle “I Do, I Don’t”: The Benefits and Perils of Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage in the United States—One Year Later
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 12; doi:10.3390/h6020012
Received: 14 February 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
PDF Full-text (248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In 1970, a gay male couple applied for and was given a marriage license in Minnesota. The license was eventually rescinded by court order. Forty-five years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, limiting the
[...] Read more.
In 1970, a gay male couple applied for and was given a marriage license in Minnesota. The license was eventually rescinded by court order. Forty-five years later, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, limiting the federal definition of marriage to consist of one man and one woman, was unconstitutional. The result was the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United States. The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of establishing the right for same-sex couples to legally marry. It outlines the benefits and costs to LGBT communities one year after the establishment of same-sex marriage in the U.S. This paper explores the limits of utilizing a rights-based approach when advocating social change. The recommendation is for LGBT individuals, communities and allies to shift tactics to adopt a capabilities approach to organizing and mobilizing people, groups, and organizations around issues of injustice. A capabilities framework addresses the complexities of individual and community needs while providing a foundation for coalition building and lasting positive social change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)

Other

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Open AccessFeature PaperEssay One Message Leading to Another
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 34; doi:10.3390/h6020034
Received: 15 February 2017 / Accepted: 19 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
PDF Full-text (148 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)
Open AccessFeature PaperEssay Action, Passion, Crises
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 24; doi:10.3390/h6020024
Received: 17 February 2017 / Accepted: 12 April 2017 / Published: 18 April 2017
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Abstract
The title of this speech is taken from a remark of the renowned Judge Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr: “When we were young our hearts were touched with fire...[and as]...life is action and passion, it is required of [one] that [one] should share the
[...] Read more.
The title of this speech is taken from a remark of the renowned Judge Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr: “When we were young our hearts were touched with fire...[and as]...life is action and passion, it is required of [one] that [one] should share the passion and action of [one’s] time, at the peril of being judged not to have lived [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender in Times of Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Conversation)

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