Special Issue "Animal Narratology"

A special issue of Humanities (ISSN 2076-0787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 January 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Joela Jacobs

Department of German Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: (520) 621-1841
Interests: 19th-21st century German literature and film; animal studies; environmental humanities; Jewish studies; the history of sexuality; and the history of science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Storytelling is often cited as one of the characteristics that distinguishes humans from animals. Yet a look at world literature reveals many animals as the narrators of our tales. Animals speak not only in fables and fairy tales, but also narrate novels, voice love poems, and deliver philosophical treatises. Across genres and time, both wild and domesticated animals give accounts of their lives and their worlds, which usually contain human beings. Animal narrators negotiate their relationship with humans, while defamiliarizing the human way of perceiving the world. And yet, these texts are written by human authors who chose an animal voice, a specific species, and a literary genre for a particular purpose—one that tends to be as much, if not more about the human as it is about the animal. In fact, analyses have predominantly focused on the human side of these texts until the recent “animal turn” in literary studies. This focus on the animal in literature vows to take the animal seriously, which has been generating new readings and discoveries regarding texts from the canon and beyond. Literary animal studies has the potential to reveal the history of animal narration, such as clusters of animal species, type, or even breed at certain times; to interrogate animal narrators’ appeals to particular audiences, from children’s books to political satire; and to uncover writers’ ways of avoiding censorship and persecution by channeling an animal voice in their works. In addition, concepts from animal agency to zoopoetics have increased the theoretical complexity of the investigation of animals in literature and are connecting animal studies to some of the concerns of fields such as environmental humanities, race and gender studies.

However, studies of animal narration are still scant and scattered, and there seems to be a need to close a perceived gap between classical scholarship on animals in literature (such as, for instance, Theodore Ziolkowski’s insightful 1983 genealogy of “philosopher dogs” in the Western canon) and newer theoretical premises brought forth by literary animal studies that petition for reading the animal as animal. There also appears to be a perhaps problematic tendency toward taxonomy inherent in approaches to both animals and narration that has yet to be addressed. This special issue of Humanities on the theme of “Animal Narratology” therefore aims to paint a fuller picture of animal narrators from various species, at different times, and from a variety of literary traditions. The breadth of this approach is to be supplemented with systematic considerations of the specific texts and contexts, so as to account for larger developments relevant to the literary history, genre, and narratological strategies exemplified by each animal narrator. Humanities thus invites contributions that bring together the close reading of texts containing animal narrators with (a) theoretical deliberations about narratology (such as dialogism, diegetic levels, empathy, focalization, framing, graphic storytelling, metaphoricity, realism, reliability, representation, serialization, simultaneity, structure, suspense, symbolism, etc.) and (b) relevant questions of ethics, religion, race, gender, sexuality, history, philosophy, sociology, science, and the arts. Texts from literature in any language are welcome (with translation), and an even distribution of Western and non-Western literature is desired. Articles will be due January 1, 2017 and should be between 6000 and 8000 words in length. Interested contributors should send a proposal of 250–500 words with a short bio or their CV to the guest editor, Dr. Joela Jacobs, at joelajacobs@email.arizona.edu by July 20, 2016. You will be notified of your preliminary acceptance (subject to peer review of the completed article) within two weeks, and questions are welcome at any time. Humanities is an international, peer-reviewed, quick-refereeing scholarly open access journal with a focus on the core values of the Humanities. There is no article processing fee, and this special edition is slated to appear both online and in book format (e-book and print on demand).

Dr. Joela Jacobs
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Humanities is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • animal narrator
  • animal studies
  • close reading
  • genre
  • human-animal studies
  • literary history
  • literary studies
  • narratology
  • speaking animals
  • species
  • world literature

Published Papers (23 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Whiteout: Animal Traces in Werner Herzog’s Grizzly Man and Encounters at the End of the World
Humanities 2017, 6(4), 89; doi:10.3390/h6040089
Received: 31 July 2017 / Revised: 1 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 11 November 2017
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Open AccessArticle
Seeing Beings: “Dog” Looks Back at “God”: Unfixing Canis familiaris in Kornél Mundruczó’s Film Fehér isten/White God (2014)
Humanities 2017, 6(4), 82; doi:10.3390/h6040082
Received: 6 July 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 October 2017 / Published: 1 November 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
More than Stories, More than Myths: Animal/Human/Nature(s) in Traditional Ecological Worldviews
Humanities 2017, 6(4), 78; doi:10.3390/h6040078
Received: 25 July 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 October 2017 / Published: 20 October 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Narrating Entanglement: Cixous’ “Stigmata, or Job the Dog”
Humanities 2017, 6(4), 75; doi:10.3390/h6040075
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 26 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 October 2017 / Published: 15 October 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Insects and the Kafkaesque: Insectuous Re-Writings in Visual and Audio-Visual Media
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 74; doi:10.3390/h6030074
Received: 16 June 2017 / Revised: 8 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 16 September 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Animal Dystopia in Marie Darrieussecq’s Novel Truismes
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 65; doi:10.3390/h6030065
Received: 22 May 2017 / Revised: 3 July 2017 / Accepted: 23 August 2017 / Published: 25 August 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Search for Dog in Cervantes
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 49; doi:10.3390/h6030049
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 9 July 2017 / Accepted: 11 July 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Eloquent Alogia: Animal Narrators in Ancient Greek Literature
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 37; doi:10.3390/h6020037
Received: 21 January 2017 / Revised: 15 May 2017 / Accepted: 27 May 2017 / Published: 3 June 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
‘In The Empire of the Senses’ and the Narrative Horizons of Comics
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 31; doi:10.3390/h6020031
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 14 May 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Question of Life and Death: The Aesopic Animal Fables on Why Not to Kill
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 29; doi:10.3390/h6020029
Received: 12 March 2017 / Revised: 1 May 2017 / Accepted: 3 May 2017 / Published: 13 May 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
“Against the Dog Only a Dog”. Talking Canines Civilizing Cynicism in Cervantes’ “coloquio de los perros” (With Tentative Remarks on the Discourse and Method of Animal Studies)
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 28; doi:10.3390/h6020028
Received: 1 January 2017 / Revised: 17 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 13 May 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
An Unheard, Inhuman Music: Narrative Voice and the Question of the Animal in Kafka’s “Josephine, the Singer or the Mouse Folk”
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 26; doi:10.3390/h6020026
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 25 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 3 May 2017
Cited by 1 PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-textXML Full-text
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Literary Autozoographies: Contextualizing Species Life in German Animal Autobiography
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 23; doi:10.3390/h6020023
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 2 April 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 13 April 2017
Cited by 1 PDF Full-text (316 KB) | HTML Full-textXML Full-text
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Narrative Transformed: The Fragments around Franz Kafka’s “A Report to an Academy”
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 19; doi:10.3390/h6020019
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 2 April 2017 / Accepted: 6 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Animal Poetry and Empathy
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 18; doi:10.3390/h6020018
Received: 24 January 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 5 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Toward the Eco-Narrative: Rethinking the Role of Conflict in Storytelling
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 17; doi:10.3390/h6020017
Received: 16 January 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 3 April 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Barking at Heaven’s Door: Pluto Mehra in the Hindi Film Dil Dhadakne Do
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 16; doi:10.3390/h6020016
Received: 15 December 2016 / Revised: 24 March 2017 / Accepted: 3 April 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
“And in That Moment I Leapt upon His Shoulder”: Non-Human Intradiegetic Narrators in The Wind on the Moon
Humanities 2017, 6(2), 13; doi:10.3390/h6020013
Received: 9 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 26 March 2017 / Published: 30 March 2017
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Open AccessArticle
Unreliability and the Animal Narrator in Richard Adams’s The Plague Dogs
Humanities 2017, 6(1), 6; doi:10.3390/h6010006
Received: 20 December 2016 / Revised: 13 February 2017 / Accepted: 6 March 2017 / Published: 8 March 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
An Animal-Centered Perspective on Colonial Oppression: Animal Representations and the Narrating Ox in Uwe Timm’s ‘‘Morenga’’ (1978)
Humanities 2017, 6(1), 3; doi:10.3390/h6010003
Received: 20 December 2016 / Accepted: 4 February 2017 / Published: 10 February 2017
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Function of HumAnimAllegory
Humanities 2017, 6(1), 2; doi:10.3390/h6010002
Received: 27 July 2016 / Revised: 14 December 2016 / Accepted: 16 January 2017 / Published: 22 January 2017
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Open AccessArticle
Narrating Animal Trauma in Bulgakov and Tolstoy
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 84; doi:10.3390/h5040084
Received: 5 October 2016 / Revised: 6 November 2016 / Accepted: 8 November 2016 / Published: 15 November 2016
Cited by 2 PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-textXML Full-text
Open AccessArticle
Animal Autobiography; Or, Narration beyond the Human
Humanities 2016, 5(4), 82; doi:10.3390/h5040082
Received: 10 August 2016 / Revised: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 18 October 2016
Cited by 5 PDF Full-text (237 KB) | HTML Full-textXML Full-text
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