Special Issue "Catalysts for Hydrogen Purification for Fuel Cell Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Arturo Martínez-Arias

Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), 28049 Madrid, Spain
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Interests: energy; hydrogen production; fuel cells; environmental catalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Eun Duck Park

Division Energy System Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443749, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CO oxidation, Preferential CO oxidation, Selective CO methanation, C1 chemistry, Methane activation, Biomass conversion
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Salvatore Scirè

Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Phone: +39 095 7385112
Fax: +39 095 580138
Interests: synthesis and catalytic activity measurements of supported catalysts; physico-chemical characterization of supported metal catalysts; catalysts for environmental protection; catalysts in the petrochemical industry and refinery; catalysts for energy production; gold based mono and bimetallic catalysts; gold-based catalysts for sensors and pollution control devices; low temperature combustion of VOCs; photocatalytic oxidation and water splitting; hydrogen on demand production; hydrogen purification for fuel cell applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As interest in fuel cells grows, economical hydrogen supply is becoming an important issue. Ultimately, it would be desirable to produce electricity or generate hydrogen through electrolysis of water using renewable energy. However, it is realistic to produce hydrogen by chemically converting fossil fuel in the present or near future. In this process, some carbon monoxide is inevitably contained in the hydrogen, and it is expected that selective removal of carbon monoxide will contribute to the commercialization of the hydrogen fuel cells. In this special issue, we want to construct an overview of the results of various studies on various catalyst systems for removing carbon monoxide remaining in hydrogen. Therefore, we will focus on theoretical approaches to catalytic oxidation, selective catalytic hydrogenation, or carbon monoxide removal through membrane-associated catalysis, as well as research papers on various approaches including practical catalyst studies.

Prof. Dr. Arturo Martínez-Arias
Prof. Dr. Eun Duck Park
Prof. Dr. Scirè Salvatore
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Preferential CO oxidation
  • Selective CO methanation
  • Membrane reactor

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Improved CO-PROX Performance of CuO/CeO2 Catalysts by Using Nanometric Ceria as Support
Catalysts 2018, 8(5), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8050209
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 11 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 May 2018 / Published: 15 May 2018
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Abstract
Despite of the huge number of papers about the catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX) for the purification of H2 streams, there is still a need for more effective catalysts in order to reduce the large required catalyst volume of CO-PROX unity.
[...] Read more.
Despite of the huge number of papers about the catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX) for the purification of H2 streams, there is still a need for more effective catalysts in order to reduce the large required catalyst volume of CO-PROX unity. In this work, large surface area nanometric ceria was used as support for CuO/CeO2 catalysts with CuO load up to 10 wt % easily dispersed by wet impregnation. Catalysts were characterized by ICP-MS, XRD, SEM/EDS, N2 physisorption, H2 temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and CO2 temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and tested under different reaction conditions (including under feed containing inhibiting species such as CO2 and H2O). Catalytic tests revealed that our samples show high activity and selectivity even under stringent reaction conditions; moreover, they result among the most active catalysts when compared to those reported in the scientific literature. The high activity can be related to the enhanced amount of highly dispersed copper sites in strong interaction with ceria related to the nature of the nanometric support, as evidenced by the characterization techniques. Despite the high concentration of active copper sites, catalytic performance is limited by CO2 desorption from ceria in the neighborhood of copper sites, which prevents a further improvement. This suggests that new catalyst formulations should also provide a lower affinity towards CO2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalysts for Hydrogen Purification for Fuel Cell Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Ru–Pd Bimetallic Catalysts Supported on CeO2-MnOX Oxides as Efficient Systems for H2 Purification through CO Preferential Oxidation
Catalysts 2018, 8(5), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8050203
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 12 May 2018
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Abstract
The catalytic performances of Ru/ceria-based catalysts in the CO preferential oxidation (CO-PROX) reaction are discussed here. Specifically, the effect of the addition of different oxides to Ru/CeO2 has been assessed. The Ru/CeO2-MnOx system showed the best performance in the
[...] Read more.
The catalytic performances of Ru/ceria-based catalysts in the CO preferential oxidation (CO-PROX) reaction are discussed here. Specifically, the effect of the addition of different oxides to Ru/CeO2 has been assessed. The Ru/CeO2-MnOx system showed the best performance in the 80–120 °C temperature range, advantageous for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. Furthermore, the influence of the addition of different metals to this mixed oxide system has been evaluated. The bimetallic Ru–Pd/CeO2-MnOx catalyst exhibited the highest yield to CO2 (75%) at 120 °C whereas the monometallic Ru/CeO2-MnOx sample was that one with the highest CO2 yield (60%) at 100 °C. The characterization data (H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) pointed out that the co-presence of manganese oxide and ruthenium enhances the mobility/reactivity of surface ceria oxygens accounting for the good CO-PROX performance of this system. Reducible oxides as CeO2 and MnOx, in fact, play two important functions, namely weakening the CO adsorption on the metal active sites and providing additional sites for adsorption/activation of O2, thus changing the mechanism from competitive Langmuir–Hinshelwood into non-competitive one-step dual site Langmuir–Hinshelwood/Mars–van Krevelen. As confirmed by H2-TPR and XPS measurements, these features are boosted by the simultaneous presence of ruthenium and palladium. The strong reciprocal interaction of these metals between them and with the CeO2-MnOx support was assumed to be responsible of the promoted reducibility/reactivity of CeO2 oxygens, thus resulting in the best CO-PROX efficiency at low temperature of the Ru-Pd/CeO2-MnOx catalyst. The higher selectivity to CO2 found on the Ru–Pd system, which reduces the undesired H2 consumption, represents a promising result of this research, being one of the key aims of the design of CO-PROX catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalysts for Hydrogen Purification for Fuel Cell Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Preferential CO Oxidation in H2 over Au/La2O3/Al2O3 Catalysts: The Effect of the Catalyst Reduction Method
Catalysts 2018, 8(5), 183; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8050183
Received: 2 April 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 30 April 2018
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Abstract
We investigated the influence of the reduction method on the preferential oxidation of CO in H2 (CO-PROX) over Au/La2O3/Al2O3 catalysts. An Au/La2O3/Al2O3 sample, prepared using deposition–precipitation with urea,
[...] Read more.
We investigated the influence of the reduction method on the preferential oxidation of CO in H2 (CO-PROX) over Au/La2O3/Al2O3 catalysts. An Au/La2O3/Al2O3 sample, prepared using deposition–precipitation with urea, was reduced by chemical reduction with NaBH4 or glycerol. Several techniques, such as diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy after CO adsorption (CO-DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the catalysts. Additionally, the catalysts were examined by in situ DRIFTS during methanol decomposition. The results reveal that the reduction method affects the average particle size and electronic state of gold, as well as the characteristics of the CO–Au0 interactions. The best CO-PROX performance was observed for the catalyst chemically reduced using NaBH4 with a NaBH4/Au molar ratio of 35. This catalyst contained gold particles with size of ~4 nm, for which the XPS binding energy was lower than that of metallic gold. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalysts for Hydrogen Purification for Fuel Cell Applications)
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