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Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2016)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial The International Journal of Turbomachinery Propulsion and Power: The Open Access Dissemination Tool for Research on Turbomachinery
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2016, 1(1), 1; doi:10.3390/ijtpp1010001
Received: 17 June 2016 / Accepted: 25 July 2016 / Published: 11 August 2016
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Abstract
It is a true privilege for me to welcome the launch issue of the International Journal of Turbomachinery Propulsion and Power, a new open access journal focussing on science and technology development of turbomachinery in the related relevant fields of turbomachinery based
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It is a true privilege for me to welcome the launch issue of the International Journal of Turbomachinery Propulsion and Power, a new open access journal focussing on science and technology development of turbomachinery in the related relevant fields of turbomachinery based propulsion and power systems. Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Impact of the Exhaust Geometry on Flow Losses in a High-Pressure Steam Turbine
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2016, 1(1), 2; doi:10.3390/ijtpp1010002
Received: 14 September 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
The design of modern steam turbines for power plant applications is steering towards higher efficiencies. A considerable contribution to this aim is expected from a reduction of flow losses in turbine intakes and exhausts. The present study therefore deals with the optimisation of
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The design of modern steam turbines for power plant applications is steering towards higher efficiencies. A considerable contribution to this aim is expected from a reduction of flow losses in turbine intakes and exhausts. The present study therefore deals with the optimisation of the exhaust of a high-pressure (HP) turbine. In the first part of this study a numerical model is presented which allows for a precise representation of the exhaust flow. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been validated with a fair amount of experimental data from a test rig. For the second part of the study comprehensive numerical investigations have been carried out, considering the major geometrical parameters of such a geometry. In order to minimize the effort in design time and preprocessing a fully parametric 3D model of the geometry is created to prepare the different design variations. The results of these simulations allow to assess the performance differences of given exhaust designs in the early design phase without the need for expensive CFD simulations. Finally a potential for improvement of 300 kW for a 800 MW power plant is shown by means of a comparison of an optimised design to the baseline geometry. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra-Low Aspect Ratio Centripetal Turbine Stator
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2016, 1(1), 3; doi:10.3390/ijtpp1010003
Received: 26 August 2016 / Revised: 20 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 26 November 2016
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Abstract
An extensive measurement campaign was carried out at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics to assess the aerodynamic performance of an ultra-low aspect ratio centripetal turbine stator. The test section consisted of 18 periodic sectors of two blade passages each, tested at
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An extensive measurement campaign was carried out at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics to assess the aerodynamic performance of an ultra-low aspect ratio centripetal turbine stator. The test section consisted of 18 periodic sectors of two blade passages each, tested at transonic conditions in a blow-down facility. Particle image velocimetry (2D-PIV) measurements were performed in the trailing edge area at blade mid-height. Further downstream, 16 micro virtual 3-hole pressure probes were used to measure the aerodynamic performance at about 44% of the radial chord, downstream of the trailing edge. Results describe a highly swirling flow-field characterized by a very large tangential velocity component increasing at smaller radii. The radial component decreased instead to compensate for an opening of the test section closer to its center, therefore enhancing the tangential nature of the generated flow field. Adjacent blades showed asymmetric wakes as an effect of the particular design of the nozzle. The performance analysis exhibited very high loss coefficients (always higher than 12%) which have to be related to the extremely small aspect ratio of the cascade. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Film Cooling Effectiveness Downstream of Trailing Edge Slots Including Cutback Surface Protuberances
Int. J. Turbomach. Propuls. Power 2016, 1(1), 4; doi:10.3390/ijtpp1010004
Received: 17 October 2016 / Accepted: 5 December 2016 / Published: 17 December 2016
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Abstract
The trailing edge of the high pressure turbine blade and vane presents significant challenges to the turbine cooling engineer. The current research has focused specifically on the effect of cutback surface protuberance, or “land”, shapes on film cooling effectiveness. A set of six
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The trailing edge of the high pressure turbine blade and vane presents significant challenges to the turbine cooling engineer. The current research has focused specifically on the effect of cutback surface protuberance, or “land”, shapes on film cooling effectiveness. A set of six different land geometries has been investigated in a large scale model of the trailing edge pressure side ejection slot exit. Slot height and width and lip height was maintained. Pressure sensitive paint was used to measure adiabatic film cooling effectiveness at five blowing ratios ranging from 0.6 to 1.4 in increments of 0.2. High-resolution full surface distributions of film cooling effectiveness both on the cutback surface and the top of the lands were recorded. It was found that tapering the lands did not significantly increase effectiveness on the lands and slightly reduced effectiveness near the lands. Using a diffuser shape improved average effectiveness greatly and gave the best overall performance up to the end of the lands except at the lowest blowing ratio of 0.6, where having no lands was slightly better. Full article
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