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Safety 2018, 4(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety4020018

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Gaze-Based Training Intervention on Latent Hazard Anticipation Skills for Young Drivers: A Driving Simulator Study

1
Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk 23529, VA, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Çankaya University, Ankara 06790, Turkey
3
Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, N2L 3G1 ON, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 October 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
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Abstract

A PC-based training program (Road Awareness and Perception Training or RAPT; Pradhan et al., 2009), proven effective for improving young novice drivers’ hazard anticipation skills, did not fully maximize the hazard anticipation performance of young drivers despite the use of similar anticipation scenarios in both, the training and the evaluation drives. The current driving simulator experiment examined the additive effects of expert eye movement videos following RAPT training on young drivers’ hazard anticipation performance compared to video-only and RAPT-only conditions. The study employed a between-subject design in which 36 young participants (aged 18–21) were equally and randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions, were outfitted with an eye tracker and drove four unique scenarios on a driving simulator to evaluate the effect of treatment on their anticipation skills. The results indicate that the young participants that viewed the videos of expert eye movements following the completion of RAPT showed significant improvements in their hazard anticipation ability (85%) on the subsequent experimental evaluation drives compared to those young drivers who were only exposed to either the RAPT training (61%) or the Video (43%). The results further imply that videos of expert eye movements shown immediately after RAPT training may improve the drivers’ anticipation skills by helping them map and integrate the spatial and tactical knowledge gained in a training program within dynamic driving environments involving latent hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: hazard anticipation; training; driving simulation; eye movement; young driver hazard anticipation; training; driving simulation; eye movement; young driver
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Yamani, Y.; Bıçaksız, P.; Palmer, D.B.; Hatfield, N.; Samuel, S. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Gaze-Based Training Intervention on Latent Hazard Anticipation Skills for Young Drivers: A Driving Simulator Study. Safety 2018, 4, 18.

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