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Safety 2016, 2(2), 11; doi:10.3390/safety2020011

Sport Cycling Crashes among Males on Public Roads, the Influence of Bunch Riding, Experience and Competitiveness

Stichting Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Verkeersveiligheid (SWOV), Institute for Road Safety Research, Bezuidenhoutseweg 62, The Hague 2594AW, The Netherlands
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jake Olivier
Received: 10 November 2015 / Revised: 30 March 2016 / Accepted: 31 March 2016 / Published: 6 April 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Return of Cycling—Safety Implications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [185 KB, uploaded 6 April 2016]

Abstract

Introduction: Since 2006, the number of seriously injured bicyclists in The Netherlands has increased significantly. This is also the case for sport cyclists. Over 80% of sport cyclists are male. We propose three factors that may contribute to involvement in sport cycling crashes among males: Bunch riding (cycling in a group), the inflow of sport cyclists with little experience and a competitive attitude. Methods: Early 2014, a questionnaire was sent to 2625 members of the Dutch Tour Cycling Union to obtain data on involvement in sport cycling crashes in the year 2013 and possible contributing factors (e.g., bunch riding, experience, competitiveness, distance travelled). Binary logistic regression analysis was applied to compare data from male respondents (N = 744). Contrast was made between those who reported involvement in a crash (N = 313) and those who did not (N = 431). Results: Male sport cyclists who are involved in bunch riding and those who are relatively inexperienced (less than three years compared to more than 10 years) have a higher crash involvement (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.79; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.26 – 2.54) and (OR = 2.93; 95% CI = 1.42 – 6.06) regardless of age, annual distance travelled and competitive attitude. Annual distance travelled was not related to crash involvement over the year 2013, indicating that cyclists who travel a longer annual distance have a lower risk (persons involved in at least one crash per km). Conclusions: We recommend that the efficacy of bunch riding training interventions among males is evaluated, with the focus on promoting safety among inexperienced sport cyclists and bunch riding. View Full-Text
Keywords: sport cycling among males; bunch riding; cycling experience; competitiveness; road crash prevention sport cycling among males; bunch riding; cycling experience; competitiveness; road crash prevention
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Wijlhuizen, G.J.; van Gent, P.; Stipdonk, H. Sport Cycling Crashes among Males on Public Roads, the Influence of Bunch Riding, Experience and Competitiveness. Safety 2016, 2, 11.

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